Tag Archives: British history

When Might the Heir Style Himself With His New Title in Regency Romances?

First, for legal purposes, the man must present himself to the House of Lords to claim the title officially. After the will has been read and its stipulations executed, the new peer must petition the Lord Chancellor for a writ … Continue reading

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Brook, New Forest, Hampshire + the Release of “Regency Mid-Summer Mischief”

My contribution to our summer anthology, “Regency Midsummer Mischief” is a tale entitled “The Jewel Thief and the Earl.” The heroine, Miss Colleen Everley, has been taught her father’s skills of being a master thief. Her father, Thomas Everley, is … Continue reading

Posted in anthology, book excerpts, book release, British history, Dreamstone Publishing, eBooks, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, publishing, reading, reading habits, Regency era, Regency romance, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Brook, New Forest, Hampshire + the Release of “Regency Mid-Summer Mischief”

The Amazing “Daddy Long Legs” and Brighton’s History

Many of us who write Regency Romance have our tales connected to Brighton, a seaside resort some 50 miles removed from London, in East Sussex. Brighton’s popularity with the rich, famous, and royal continued in the 19th century, and saw … Continue reading

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His Majesty “Farmer George”

If one were to search history books, he would learn that King George III was King of England during the American Revolutionary War. He might also discover that the same King George “went mad” in his later years. Hopefully, the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, kings and queens, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, royalty, science | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Second Shepherds’ Play, England’s “First Comedy”

  The Wakefield mystery play cycle included The Second Shepherd’s Play. The author is unknown, but the play is commonly attributed to the Wakefield Master. This play dates from the latter half of the 15th Century. It is written in Middle … Continue reading

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Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex’s Two Illegal Marriages

Prince Augustus Frederick was the sixth son and ninth child of King George III and Queen Charlotte. He was born at Buckingham House on 27 January 1773. He was initially tutored at home. However, in 1785, along with his brothers, … Continue reading

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Gwenllian, Last Princess of Wales

Gwenllian of Wales or Gwenllian ferch Llywelyn (June 1282 – 7 June 1337) was the only child of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the last native Prince of Wales (Tywysog Cymru). Born in the Gwynedd royal home in Abergwyngregyn near Bangor, Gwynedd, Gwellian’s mother died in … Continue reading

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Saint Gilbert of Sempringham in Lincolnshire

As one of my new stories is set in Lincolnshire, England, I have been researching “bits of history” from the shire. Today, I bring you Saint Gilbert. At Sempringham, a bit north of Bourne, we find the Gilbertine Order, the … Continue reading

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A Precious Piece of English Architecture: Lincoln Cathedral

The Lincoln Cathedral is the third largest English cathedral and one the prime examples of Gothic architecture. It is a sight that can easily steal away one’s breath. Its long nave crowns the hilltop 200 feet above the River Witham, … Continue reading

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Milton Abbas, the First Planned Village in England

Dating back to 1773, Milton Abbas is a village in Dorset, eight miles south of Blandford and eleven miles northeast of Dorchester. Under the instructions of Lord Milton, the town of Middleton was, literally, moved elsewhere.  Middleton was originally within … Continue reading

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