Monthly Archives: March 2022

Dressmaking During the Regency

Often in a Regency book, we find a situation where the woman requires a new day dress, gown, riding habit, etc. I was reading a book of late where the modiste finished several gowns in two days, but was that … Continue reading

Posted in British history, commerce, fashion, Georgian England, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

A Voidable Marriage in History: Marrying the Sister of One’s Late Wife or the Brother of One’s Late Husband

A plot we readers often encounter in historical romance set in the Regency Period is when the hero takes up with his late wife’s sister. But was it possible? “For most of the nineteenth century, the question of whether a … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, marriage, real life tales, Regency era, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , | 19 Comments

The Obsession with Money and Society in Austen’s Novels

 Austen’s novels speak loudly with society’s obsession with money and connections. Money and status was obtained through marriage. What we soon come to accept as a reader of Jane Austen’s novels is that her heroines marry for love (and a … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, estates, family, Georgian Era, historical fiction, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, Pride and Prejudice, reading, reading habits, Regency personalities, Regency romance, romance | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Characterization of Elinor Dashwood in Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility”

Austen began writing Elinor and Marianne as an epistolary novel in 1795. It was published as Sense and Sensibility in 1811. The novel set the tone for many of Austen’s titles: defiance of the social and economic barriers to marriage and … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Young Children’s Clothing in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Before the 20th Century, clothing for boys and girls lacked “gender” distinctions. Up until the 16th Century, both males and females worn some sort of gown or tunic. However, eventually, male and female clothing became more distinct. Boys and girls … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British history, fashion, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

To Describe the Aristocracy During the Regency, Would One Use the “Ton,” the “Bon Ton” or Something Else?

Le bon ton is a French phrase meaning “the good style” or “good form.” So one could be part of the ton, if one had the style for it, which is why Beau Brummell could be a leader of fashion … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, political stance, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on To Describe the Aristocracy During the Regency, Would One Use the “Ton,” the “Bon Ton” or Something Else?

Jane Austen and the Brontës: Tory Daughters (an Overview)

Recently, I was asked by a local teacher to speak to her English class after the students had read Pride and Prejudice and Wuthering Heights. Below, you will find my notes for a comparison/contrast between the Brontës and Austen. As I have been out … Continue reading

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“Obstinate, Headstrong Girl,” Introducing “Austens of Broadford,” a Guest Post and Chapter Excerpt from Carole Penfield

A life lesson universally acknowledged is that when you marry someone, you marry into their entire family. Not infrequently, some family member may act to interfere with the happiness of a couple during their courtship. Such was the case for … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, books, British history, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on “Obstinate, Headstrong Girl,” Introducing “Austens of Broadford,” a Guest Post and Chapter Excerpt from Carole Penfield

Ben Jonson’s “Song to Celia” ~ The Poem You Did Not Know Was a Song

 One of my favorite love songs comes to us from the poet Ben Jonson. According to Poets.org, “The poet, essayist, and playwright Ben Jonson was born on June 11, 1572 in London, England. In 1598, Jonson wrote what is considered his … Continue reading

Posted in British history, literature, love quotes, music, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Major General Adam Stephen, Real-Life Model for Doctor Spurlock in My Tale, “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

In my tale “Captain Stanwick’s Bride,” I based Elizabeth Spurlock on my own 8th great-grandmother, a Powhatan Indian Princess. But where did I find the inspiration for the lady’s husband? Easy enough to answer. I am from West Virginia originally, … Continue reading

Posted in America, American History, Appalachia, British history, British Navy, West Virginia | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Major General Adam Stephen, Real-Life Model for Doctor Spurlock in My Tale, “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”