Category Archives: Church of England

Derbyshire and Well Dressings

The origin of the practice of what is known as “well dressings” is a bit of a mystery. Most believe the celebration dates back to the Celts, but few places, other than Derbyshire and Staffordshire, England, have kept the tradition. … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, buildings and structures, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, publishing, real life tales, tradtions, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Retracing Themes in Austen’s Life and Works, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on February 22, 2018. Enjoy!!!  My blogs over the last two years have covered a wide expanse of territory: Jane Austen’s fiction; her speech patterns; her looks; her romantic life, both real and … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, family, film adaptations, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage, military, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Captain James Jack, Hero of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence

On Friday, I presented you with a bit of local history in the form of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. Yesterday was the celebration of Meck-Dec Day. Today, permit me to introduce you to the hero of the Mecklenburg Declaration … Continue reading

Posted in America, American History, British history, Church of England, Declaration of Independence | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Why Gretna Green? Marriage Over the Anvil, a Guest Post by Alexa Adams

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on 23 February 2018. Enjoy!!  “I am going to Gretna Green, and if you cannot guess with who, I shall think you a simpleton, for there is but one man in the world … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, Regency era, Scotland | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Fleet Prison Marriages of the 1700s

Marriage ceremonies associated with the Fleet Prison is London were many in the mid to late 1700s. It is estimated that in the 1740s over half of London’s marriage ceremonies took place in “marriage shops” surrounding the Fleet Prison. By … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, real life tales, Scotland | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Jane Austen and the Casualties of War, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

Jane Austen had two brothers who served in the navy, Frank and Charles, and two who served in the militia, Edward and Henry. Father George Austen and brother James, as clergymen, were discouraged from bearing arms but recruited soldiers and … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, military | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Special Licences in Regency Era

In 1753, the Hardwick Marriage Act passed, and Georgian couples in England and Wales could choose among three ways to marry: with the reading of the banns, by a common (sometimes referred to as an “ordinary”) licence, and by special … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Levirate marriage, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, Regency era, Wales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments