Category Archives: Church of England

What Exactly Did It Mean for A Clergyman to Have a “Living” Bestowed Upon Him During the Regency Period?

We often read in a Regency era book something to the effect of the master of the estate bestowing a “living” upon a clergyman. Exactly, what did that entail? Once the living was bestowed, could the owner of the estate … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex’s Two Illegal Marriages

Prince Augustus Frederick was the sixth son and ninth child of King George III and Queen Charlotte. He was born at Buckingham House on 27 January 1773. He was initially tutored at home. However, in 1785, along with his brothers, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, marriage | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Origin of the Drama – Everyman and The Second Shepherd’s Play

Morality Plays, those in which the characters were allegorical persons would attempt to drive home a moral. They provided more scope to the imagination for new plots and incidents and afforded a  chance for delineation of characters. (For more information … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Chaucer, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, Chaucer, Church of England, drama, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

“Old Lady Day” ~ No It is Not My Birthday!

Quarter Days are the four dates in each year that align with religious festivals. The days are roughly three months apart and are close to the two solstices and the two equinoxes. In British history, these days were the ones … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Chaucer, Christmas, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the UK, real life tales, research, servant life, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on “Old Lady Day” ~ No It is Not My Birthday!

Easter During the Regency

According to many sources, for many years during the Regency (1811-1820), Parliament did not open its first session of the year until after Easter. But the list of dates, I have included below, contradicts that idea somewhat. Generally, the new … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, England, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

March 25, Lady Day – What are the Quarter Days in UK?

In the Western liturgical year, Lady Day is the traditional name in some English-speaking countries of the Feast of the Annunciation, which is celebrated on 25 March, and commemorates the visit of the archangel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, during … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, holidays, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, medieval, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on March 25, Lady Day – What are the Quarter Days in UK?

Catholic – Protestant Marriages During the late Georgian Era

When discussing Catholic emancipation, etc., the year makes a difference. George III’s era was far stricter against Catholics having any kind of power. That was one reason why many members of parliament quit in 1801, including Pitt the Younger and … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Inheritance, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, political stance, real life tales, Regency era, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Catholic – Protestant Marriages During the late Georgian Era

The Succession That Led to the Victorian Era

The Encyclopedia Britannica defines the Salic Law of Succession as “the rule by which, in certain sovereign dynasties, persons descended from a previous sovereign only through a woman were excluded from succession to the throne. Gradually formulated in France, the … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, George IV, Georgian, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, political stance, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The “Skinny” on Abdicating a Title During the Regency Era

Many times in Regency-based novels we have the situation where for one reason or another, the hero refused the title he has inherited and “abdicates” his new peerage. The question is whether this is a viable plot line.  The answer … Continue reading

Posted in Black Opal Books, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, estates, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Inheritance, kings and queens, legacy, peerage, real life tales, Regency era, research, titles of aristocracy, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Vicars and Rectors and Livings, a Guest Post from Elaine Owen

(As there was much interest on my recent post on the Clergy during the Regency era, I thought this perspective from Elaine Owen might also assist in clarifying the differences. It first appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 3 … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on Vicars and Rectors and Livings, a Guest Post from Elaine Owen