Category Archives: architecture

Half-Timbered Architectural Elements, a Tudor Construction

One of the most prominent features of Tudor and medieval architecture is what is called “half-timbered houses.” The editors of the Encyclopedia Britannica describes “Half-timber work” as a, “…method of building in which external and internal walls are constructed of … Continue reading

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Crafting a Thatched Roof

We all admire the idea of a cottage with a thatched roof, but what are the practicalities?  History: Thatching roofs can be traced to the Bronze Age. In Dorset, one can observe the remains of a round hut that displays … Continue reading

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Jane Austen’s Connections to the Stoneleigh Barony

For a chapter I am doing for the upcoming release of In Bed with the British (July 2017), I explore questions of inheritance and the custom of primogeniture. Needless to say, I could not do so without looking at Jane Austen’s … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, book release, books, British history, Georgian England, Great Britain, history, Inheritance, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Thomas Jefferson, the Signer Who Wrote the Declaration of Independence

Thomas Jefferson, author of the American Declaration of Independence and the third U.S. president, was born on April 13, 1743, at the Shadwell plantation located just outside of Charlottesville, Virginia. Jefferson was born into one of the most prominent families … Continue reading

Posted in American History, architecture, British history, buildings and structures, Declaration of Independence, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, political stance | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Wollaton Hall in Nottinghamshire, English Renaissance at Its Best, and Home to “The Dark Knight Rises”

Robert Smythson began work on Wollaton Hall in 1580. The Hall was to be the home of Sir Francis Willoughby. Most experts think Smythson, who also designed Hardwick Hall, in the same area, appears to have used Mount Edgcumbe in … Continue reading

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Georgian Architecture: University of London, a Metropolitan, Nonsectarian University

  In 1820, the Scottish poet, Thomas Campbell, put forth the idea of a metropolitan, nonsectarian university. With others he launched a movement in 1825 to found the University of London, for students excluded from Oxford or Cambridge by religious tests … Continue reading

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Late Regency/Early Victorian Era Cottages for the Working Man

The Working Man’s Cottage During the Regency By the time George IV took the reins as the Prince Regent, England was the most powerful industrial nation in the world. Centres of commerce sprung up, bringing with them an increase in … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, British history, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments