Category Archives: research

Very “Real” Estate: Vicars’ Close, Wells, Somerset, England

The oldest purely residential street in England is known as Vicars’ Close, which is located in Wells, Somerset, England, and dates from the mid 14th Century.  Planned by Bishop Ralph of Shrewsbury, at one time it was 42 separate houses, … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, British history, buildings and structures, customs and tradiitons, England, Great Britain, history, medieval, research | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Milton Abbas, the First Planned Village in England

Dating back to 1773, Milton Abbas is a village in Dorset, eight miles south of Blandford and eleven miles northeast of Dorchester. Under the instructions of Lord Milton, the town of Middleton was, literally, moved elsewhere.  Middleton was originally within … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, Georgian England, Georgian Era, research, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Austen Sideroads Yield Interesting Journeys, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

Combing the internet for information on the life and times of Jane Austen sometimes leads to links in which the English author is mentioned in passing or as part of a broader story. More times than not, these side trips … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, buildings and structures, Guest Blog, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, research | Tagged , , , , ,

Nigel Lewis’s “The Cover Plan Conspiracy,” a Deception Created by the Allied Forces in WWII

On June 6 of this week, I posted an article on Exercise Tiger, which was a tragic rehearsal for D-Day. That article brought me to the notice of Nigel Lewis, who has written extensively on the subject. Therefore, I asked him … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, British history, excerpt, Guest Post, history, legacy, military, real life tales, research, war, world history, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Colonel Matthew Locke, an Advocate for Universal Manhood Suffrage

On Friday, May 18, I presented with the celebration of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. On Monday, May 21, I included an article on Captain James Jack, who was not as famous as Paul Revere, but just as heroic. Today, … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British currency, Declaration of Independence, England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, political stance, real life tales, research, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, a Year Before Thomas Jefferson’s Document

Some of you realize, I live in North Carolina, a state draped in rich history. One of those events is the the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. Charlotte, North Carolina will celebration this event on Sunday: A year before Thomas Jefferson’s … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British history, British Navy, Declaration of Independence, Georgian England, history, political stance, research, war | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Regency Men’s Wear: The Coat

During the Regency era, men’s fashion changed dramatically from the powered-wig peacocks of the late 1700s. Throughout the last decade of the 18th Century, men continued to wear the coat, waistcoat, and breeches.  However, changes were seen in both the fabric used … Continue reading

Posted in British history, fashion, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era, research | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment