Tag Archives: Sense and Sensibility

The “Comedy” Found in Jane Austen’s Novels

According to Literary Devices, “Comedy is a literary genre and a type of dramatic work that is amusing and satirical in its tone, mostly having a cheerful ending. The motif   of this dramatic work is triumph over unpleasant circumstance by creating comic … Continue reading

Posted in books, British history, Georgian England, historical fiction, Inheritance, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage customs, Persuasion, political stance, primogenture, publishing, reading habits, Regency era, Regency personalities, Regency romance, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Jane Austen and the Heroine’s Essential Journey, a Guest Post from Nancy Lawrence

I loved this post from fellow Austen Author, Nancy Lawrence, because of the uniqueness of the subject, an idea I had not considered previously, but because of her lovely images from Austen film adaptations (and NOT because she included links … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, film adaptations, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, reading habits, Regency era, research, Sense & Sensibility, travel, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Austen’s Use of Coincidence and Character Development, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on 22 January 2020. Enjoy!  In a recent blog, I wrote about coincidences in Jane Austen’s work. I’m following up again today with a few more examples of how she used them and how … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Emma, film adaptations, George Wickham, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, reading habits, Sense & Sensibility, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

“It Was Certainly a Very Remarkable Coincidence!” a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

“It was certainly a very remarkable coincidence!”—Northanger Abbey. Writing from roughly 1795 on, Jane Austen is usually seen as the last major writer of the 18th century. In many novels of that century, plot coincidences were not only accepted, they were … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Emma, Georgian Era, Guest Post, heroines, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Pride and Prejudice, reading habits, Regency era, Sense & Sensibility, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Role of Servants in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

To complement my series on Life Below Stairs, I thought you might enjoy this piece from Eliza Shearer which first appeared on Austen Authors on 7 January 2020.  One of the things I love about Jane Austen is that nothing … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, Emma, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Pride and Prejudice, reading habits, Regency era, servant life, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Celebrating the Birth of Jane Austen: 16 December 1775 – What I Learned from Jane Austen

(This post was originally published on December 16, 2010. However, I could not permit Austen’s birthday to pass without notice.) It is a truth universally acknowledged that Jane Austen remains an inspiration to throngs of readers more than two centuries … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 95 Comments

On the Character of Clergymen in Jane Austen’s Novels & the Regency, a Guest Post from Alexa Adams

Alexa Adams shared this post with our followers on Austen Authors in June 2016. I thought it a worthy piece to share with you.  David Bamber ar Mr. Collins, 1995 “My dear Miss Elizabeth, I have the highest opinion in … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Church of England, family, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, religion | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

‘It was certainly a very remarkable coincidence!” – a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on October 3, 2019. The question is how do the main characters meet? And is “coincidence” and “compaction” necessary for writers? “It was certainly a very remarkable coincidence!”—Northanger Abbey. Writing from roughly 1795 … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, manuscript evaluation, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, reading habits, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, romance, Sense & Sensibility, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Regency Customs: I Won’t Dance, Don’t Ask Me ~ Using “Dance” As a Plot Device In Jane Austen’s Novels

“To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.” (Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 3) During Austen’s time, young people looked for a potential mate at dances. Austen, herself, enjoyed a good dance, and, therefore, she often … Continue reading

Posted in British history, dancing, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

The Significance of Birth Order in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on June 25, 2019. Enjoy!  Birth order has an impact on your personality and behaviour, according to many psychologists. Some of the stereotypes related to sibling birth order have primarily been confirmed by … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, customs and tradiitons, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, reading, real life tales, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,