Tag Archives: Sense and Sensibility

The Strict Social Structure of Jane Austen’s Novels

Overall, the early 19th Century novels were those that expressed society in realistic terms. Austen’s novels, as well as others of her time, immerse the reader in the various levels of society, the social strata, so to speak. Austen does … Continue reading

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The Obsession with Money and Society in Austen’s Novels

 Austen’s novels speak loudly with society’s obsession with money and connections. Money and status was obtained through marriage. What we soon come to accept as a reader of Jane Austen’s novels is that her heroines marry for love (and a … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, estates, family, Georgian Era, historical fiction, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, Pride and Prejudice, reading, reading habits, Regency personalities, Regency romance, romance | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Characterization of Elinor Dashwood in Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility”

Austen began writing Elinor and Marianne as an epistolary novel in 1795. It was published as Sense and Sensibility in 1811. The novel set the tone for many of Austen’s titles: defiance of the social and economic barriers to marriage and … Continue reading

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Lessons on Life, Courtesy of Jane Austen

Recently, I looked at the parts of Pride and Prejudice, which spoke to me early on in my life-long love of Jane Austen’s works. Then I began to think of the other Austen phrases, which have been a part of … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, reading, romance, tradtions, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

On Being a Midwife, a Guest Post from Carole Penfield

During the Georgian and Regency eras, and even earlier, most women who were “breeding” worried a great deal, as these were the most dangerous years of their life. Two of Jane Austen’s brothers lost their wives in childbirth, so she … Continue reading

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Primogeniture and Inheritance and the Need for a Widow’s Pension in Jane Austen’s Novels

By Jane Austen’s time, primogeniture was no longer the law of the land, but it remained a strongly entrenched custom of inheritance proceedings. Breaking apart large landholdings were frowned upon. An impoverished aristocracy, whose wealth rested in the agricultural realm, … Continue reading

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The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Novels

In James Fordyce’s Sermons to Young Women (1766), Fordyce says, “The world, I know not how, overlooks in our sex a thousand irregularities, which it never forgives in yours; so that the honour and peace of a family are, in … Continue reading

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A Widow’s Stipend, Jointures, Dower, Settlements, and Dowry. Which is Which in the Regency?

  English Common Law provided a widow a life interest in one-third of the freehold lands her husband owned at the time of their marriage. She could not be denied these rights unless she was found guilty of treason, felony, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, estates, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Inheritance, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, Sense & Sensibility, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Significance of Birth Order in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, “the seventh of eight children of a clergyman in a country village in Hampshire, England. Jane was very close to her older sister, Cassandra, who remained her faithful editor and critic throughout … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, customs and tradiitons, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, reading, real life tales, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Significance of Birth Order in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

The Real Life Influences Upon Jane Austen’s Novels

As authors of historical fiction, we take great pleasure in a research “tidbit,” which introduces our fictional characters to historical figures. I, for example, have introduced John Loudon McAdam, the father of the modern road, to the readers of A Touch of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Real Life Influences Upon Jane Austen’s Novels