Tag Archives: medicine

Bleeding a Patient to Cure Apoplexy During the Regency Era

In Regency novels, the reader frequently reads of one of the characters suffering an apoplexy. Exactly, what does that mean? Apoplexy (from the Ancient Greek, meaning “a striking away”) is bleeding within internal organs and the accompanying symptoms. For example, ovarian apoplexy is … Continue reading

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On Being a Midwife, a Guest Post from Carole Penfield

During the Georgian and Regency eras, and even earlier, most women who were “breeding” worried a great deal, as these were the most dangerous years of their life. Two of Jane Austen’s brothers lost their wives in childbirth, so she … Continue reading

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Edward Jenner, Father of “Vaccination”

With all the debate still going on about whether to vaccinate or not for COVID-19 and all the variants in the news, I thought we might have look at the first vaccines. Born in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, in May 1749, the … Continue reading

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“Unusual” Medical Cures Found in History

I thought to look at what was acceptable medical practice during the Regency era and all through the past. We know, for example, that the lack of what we would now call “proper” medical procedures caused Princess Charlotte to lose … Continue reading

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Picking One’s Teeth, or Getting the Research Correct + the Release of “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

If one has never written an historical book, be it fiction or nonfiction, he/she likely does not quite grasp the idea that having accuracy, even in the smallest of details, is essential. In my latest release, Captain Stanwick’s Bride: A … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, book release, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, medicine, military, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, Uncategorized, war, War of 1812, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

“Murder of a Bastard Child,” an Historical Crime Against Children

In the 18th Century in England, what was the fate of a child born to a young woman pregnant out of wedlock? Alan Taylor in the British History Georgian Lives Facebook Group tells us, “The most common capital offence for … Continue reading

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The Market for Quackery in Medicine During Late Georgian Era

Previously, I have spoken of anxiety treatments for Mrs. Bennet’s nerves. You may find the article HERE.  Recently, I have been exploring a book called Decency and Disorder: The Age of Cant 1789-1837. It is by Ben Wilson. Amazon describes … Continue reading

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Jane Austen, Contagions, & the Danger of Doubling, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 19 March 2020. I thought it appropriate to repeat here.  It has been so long since a disastrous contagion swept through the Western world that most of us have forgotten … Continue reading

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Victoria, Princess Royal, Becomes a Mother

Previously, we spoke of the marriage of Victoria, Princess Royal, to Prince Frederick of Prussia, later Frederick III, German Emperor and King of Prussia. View that article HERE. The princess was only 17 when she married “Fritz,” and she was … Continue reading

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In History, “False Teeth” Were Not So False

  What we refer to as “false” teeth are not false, for most dentures in history contained real teeth, either from an other human or from an animal. Some of the oldest finding regarding false teeth come to us from Mexico. … Continue reading

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