Category Archives: Act of Parliament

Richard Bertie’s Attempt to Become Lord Willoughby d’Eresby ~ Part II

This post is a continuation of the one from yesterday, which introduced my readers to Richard Bertie and his unsuccessful attempt to become Lord Willoughby d’Eresby.  Richard Bertie married the widowed Duchess of Suffolk and had issue by her, a … Continue reading

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Richard Bertie’s Attempt to Become Lord Willoughby d’Eresby ~ Part I

Like Barry Lyndon (see post on November 27), Richard Bertie was born of humble origins, but aspired to claim a peerage through marriage. Bertie (ca. 1517 – 9 April 1582) made an astounding marriage to the widowed Duchess of Suffolk, … Continue reading

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Proving Lines of Succession + Release of “The Earl Claims His Comfort”

Succession for a Peerage What happens to a peerage if the peer cannot be found or is presumed dead? What becomes of his wife? His children? This is a familiar plot in many Regency novels. I used it in the … Continue reading

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Inheriting a Peerage + Release of “The Earl Claims His Comfort”

Inheriting a Peerage During the Regency The manner in which a peerage is passed from one generation to the next depends upon how it was created. A peerage/title can be created by a writ of summons, which means the individual … Continue reading

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Privileges of Peers + the Release of ‘The Earl Claims His Comfort’

Privileges of a Peer During the Regency In my latest Regency romantic suspense, The Earl Claims His Comfort, there are multiple questions regarding the peerage belonging to the book’s hero. For example, can a usurper force Levison Davids, 17th Earl … Continue reading

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Could an American Inherit a Peerage? Release of “The Earl Claims His Comfort” + Excerpt & Giveaway

Could an American Inherit an English Title or Peerage? In both of my first two books from the Twins’ trilogy, the issue of whether an American could inherit a title/peerage comes into play as part of the plot. In Angel … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, Black Opal Books, blog hop, book excerpts, book release, British history, Church of England, estates, excerpt, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, Inheritance, Ireland, marriage, primogenture, Regency romance, romance, suspense, titles of aristocracy, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Infamous War of Jenkins’s Ear? Never Heard of It?

Have you ever heard of the War of Jenkins’s Ear? If not, you are not alone.  This particular war took place in colonial Georgia. It involved both Spain and England in a dispute over the land between South Carolina and … Continue reading

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