Category Archives: estates

The Strict Social Structure of Jane Austen’s Novels

Overall, the early 19th Century novels were those that expressed society in realistic terms. Austen’s novels, as well as others of her time, immerse the reader in the various levels of society, the social strata, so to speak. Austen does … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British currency, British history, customs and tradiitons, estates, Georgian England, Inheritance, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, marriage, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, primogenture, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Could an American Inherit a Peerage? Release of “The Earl Claims His Comfort” + Excerpt & Giveaway

Could an American Inherit an English Title or Peerage? In both of my first two books from the Twins’ trilogy, the issue of whether an American could inherit a title/peerage comes into play as part of the plot. In Angel … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, Black Opal Books, blog hop, book excerpts, book release, British history, Church of England, estates, excerpt, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, Inheritance, Ireland, marriage, primogenture, Regency romance, romance, suspense, titles of aristocracy, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Female Inheritance Laws + an Excerpt & Giveaway from MR. DARCY’S BRIDEs

Under English law, women were subordinate to their husbands. It was expected that she was under the “protection and influence of her husband, her baron, or lord.” The law stated the old adage of “two shall become one.” She was … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, estates, excerpt, giveaway, Inheritance, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, Pride and Prejudice, primogenture, publishing, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

The Roots of Primogeniture and Entailments

The concept of “love and romance” were never required in marriage among the English aristocracy. Certainly there were some who did marry for love, but early on, the idea of marriage became a “business transaction,” instead of a romantic joining … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, estates, Living in the UK, political stance, primogenture, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Forest of Dean

In west Gloucestershire, marked by the rivers Severn and Wye, we find the Forest of Dean, a large tract of woodland and waste land reserved for royal hunting before 1066. It remains the second largest of the principal Crown forests … Continue reading

Posted in estates, history, Industrial Revolution, kings and queens, legacy, royalty | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

“A Touch of Honor” [or] What to Do With a Character You Despise?

Early on, I convinced my traditional publisher, Ulysses Press, to print one of my Regency romances – a book I originally called A Touch of Gold and later called A Touch of Scandal. Ulysses released the book under the title … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, Church of England, estates, fashion, Georgian England, historical fiction, Inheritance, Ireland, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, medicine, Realm series, Regency era, Ulysses Press | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Celebrating the ReRelease of Vampire Darcy’s Desire, Mixing Austen with Vampiric Legends

Next Monday, I will celebrate the rerelease of my vampiric version of Pride and Prejudice, Vampire Darcy’s Desire, which I wrote in 2010. The Ulysses Press version is now out of print, and while I wait to reclaim my rights to … Continue reading

Posted in British history, dueling, estates, George Wickham, Georgian Era, gothic and paranormal, Great Britain, historical fiction, Jane Austen, legends, legends and myths, Living in the Regency, medieval, mystery, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, romance, Scotland, suspense, Ulysses Press, vampires, Victorian era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments