Tag Archives: British history

Sir Walter Scott, the Historical Romance, and the Creation of a National Identity – Part II

Recently, we had our first look at how Sir Walter Scott perfected the “formula” for historical romance while creating a national identity. [June 8, Part I]  Sir Walter Scott’s fiction quite often uses the plot devices of inheritance and lineage. … Continue reading

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The Royal Exchange

The Royal Exchange, a trapezoid-shaped structure, was opened by Queen Elizabeth I in 1571. Cornhill and Threadneedle Streets flank the exchange. The original building was destroyed by the Great Fire in 1666. It was rebuilt in 1669 and again destroyed … Continue reading

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People with Disabilities in Jane Austen’s England, a Guest Post by Elaine Owen

York Vs York: Changing Attitudes in Regency England In April, Elaine Owen shared this piece on Austen Authors. I thought it worthy of a second look.  Jane Austen did not write about disabled people in any of her books, but … Continue reading

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Finalists for the 2017 Daphne Du Maurier Award for Excellence in Mystery/Suspense

I am proud to be among these fabulous writers!!! Congrats to all!!!! The DAPHNE DU MAURIER AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN MYSTERY/SUSPENSE –Published Division Finalists for 2017 are: CATEGORY (SERIES) ROMANTIC MYSTERY/SUSPENSE Man of Action by Janie Crouch – Author Deep … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Black Opal Books, British history, eBooks, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, marriage, mystery, primogenture, Regency era, Regency romance, romance, suspense, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Half-Timbered Architectural Elements, a Tudor Construction

One of the most prominent features of Tudor and medieval architecture is what is called “half-timbered houses.” The editors of the Encyclopedia Britannica describes “Half-timber work” as a, “…method of building in which external and internal walls are constructed of … Continue reading

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Jane Austen and the Rise of the Novel, a Guest Post from Victoria Kincaid

Here is another guest post from one of my fellow Austen Authors. Victoria Kincaid takes us on the search for the “novel.”   I remember the moment in college when I realized that the novel was a relatively recent writing form. … Continue reading

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Yorkshire’s Legendary “Blind Jack” Metcalf, Extraordinary Road Builder

What do you know of  Yorkshire’s legendary hero, “Blind Jack (John Metcalf)”? JOHN METCALF was born at Knaresborough, on the 15 August, 1717 in a thatched cottage opposite Knaresborough Castle. Metcalf was considered a a pioneer in road construction. Between … Continue reading

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