Tag Archives: British history

The Mappa Mundi, the World’s Largest Medieval Map

Housed in the Hereford Cathedreal, the Mappa Mundi is believed to the be the world’s largest medieval map. England specialized in world maps of the Middle Ages. They were drawn upon cloth or walls or animal skins.  Only those who … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Age of Chaucer, British history, buildings and structures, Church of England, medieval, real life tales | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Shetland Sword Dance

 Sir Walter Scott wrote in his diary of the Shetland Sword Dance on 7 August 1814. “At Scalloway my curiosity was gratified by an account of the sword-dance, now almost lost, but still practiced in the Island of Papa…. There … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, drama, literature, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Gentlemen’s Clubs, a Guest Post from Brenda J. Webb

This post appeared on Austen Authors in October 2015. However, I thought it worthy of a second look, especially for those of you who devour everything to do with the Regency Era.  Mention White’s, Boodle’s or Brooks’s in a story … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, British history, buildings and structures, Georgian England, Guest Post, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Infamous War of Jenkins’s Ear? Never Heard of It?

Have you ever heard of the War of Jenkins’s Ear? If not, you are not alone.  This particular war took place in colonial Georgia. It involved both Spain and England in a dispute over the land between South Carolina and … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, American History, British history, British Navy, war | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Hanging a Monkey as a French Spy During the Napoleonic Wars

What do you know of the Hartlepool Monkey and the “Monkey Hangers”? I certainly knew nothing of the tale until I stumbled across it. Legend says that a shipwrecked monkey was hanged as a French spy during the Napoleonic Wars … Continue reading

Posted in ballads, British history, Georgian England, history, legends, Living in the Regency, Napoleonic Wars | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

1794: Ratcliffe on Fire and an Act of “Charity”

In 1794, a fire in East London’s Ratcliffe district of London proved to be the largest to occur between the Great Fire of 1666 and the Blitz of 1940. The Ratcliffe Highway Murders served as a model for my highly acclaimed … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Oxfordshire St. George Play

Closely related to the Morris and Sword Dancers, the Oxfordshire St. George Play is considered a kind of Mummers Play. As well as possessing close elements of kinship, the characters in all these plays are largely interchangeable. That being said, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, drama, literature, medieval | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments