Tag Archives: British history

Militia Officers’ Enlistment + the Release of “Mr. Darcy’s Inadvertent Bride” + a Giveaway

Mr. Darcy’s Inadvertent Bride Releases Today!!! When I first conceived this book, I planned to have Mr. Wickham compromise Elizabeth Bennet with a kiss and then disappear from the militia, but, before I put pen to paper, I had to … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, military, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, Vagary, war, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Courtship and the Prospect of Marriage in Jane Austen’s Time + the Release of “Mr. Darcy’s Inadvertent Bride” + a Giveaway

When a man of the Regency era proposed to the woman he wished to marry, there was still the need for parental approval. After all, the father could still without any “fortune” allocated to his daughter. Even if the couple … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, customs and tradiitons, excerpt, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage customs, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, Regency era, Regency romance, romance, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Fencibles: Defending the Homeland + an excerpt from “Mr. Darcy’s Inadvertent Bride”

Fencibles were the British “defense” (from the word ‘defencible’) forces raised for a specific war. They were raised for defense against the treat of invasion during the Seven Years’ War, the American War of Independence, the French Revolutionary Wars, the … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, military, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, war, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Babington Plot to Kill Queen Elizabeth I

Anthony Babington, the third child and eldest son of Henry Babington, was born into a wealthy Catholic family in Dethick, Derbyshire, in October 1561. The bells of the church announced his birth to the world; yet, his plotting would destroy his family. … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Elizabeth I, England, history, kings and queens, real life tales, religion, research, Scotland | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Brook, New Forest, Hampshire + the Release of “The Jewel Thief and the Earl” + a Giveaway

Today, I am celebrating the release of my Regency novella, The Jewel Thief and the Earl. If you missed this tale in last summer’s Regency Anthology, now is the time to claim it. You can find it HERE on Amazon … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, eBooks, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, publishing, reading, reading habits, Regency era, Regency romance, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Brook, New Forest, Hampshire + the Release of “The Jewel Thief and the Earl” + a Giveaway

Lady Catherine de Bourgh Character Study, a Guest Post from Amanda Kai

In my quest to learn more about Lady Catherine de Bourgh for my current work-in-progress, I’ve decided to make a character study of her. While some of the minor characters in Pride and Prejudice get no more than a line … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, film adaptations, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency romance, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Lady Catherine de Bourgh Character Study, a Guest Post from Amanda Kai

The Succession That Led to the Victorian Era

The Encyclopedia Britannica defines the Salic Law of Succession as “the rule by which, in certain sovereign dynasties, persons descended from a previous sovereign only through a woman were excluded from succession to the throne. Gradually formulated in France, the … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, George IV, Georgian, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, political stance, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Death of Princess Charlotte, Signaling the End of the Hanoverian Line of Succession Was on the Horizon

[Image: Engraving of Princess Caroline from La Belle Assemblée (1806)] Much to the surprise and relief of George III’s England, his son George, Prince of Wales, fulfilled his duty by marrying Princess Caroline of Brunswick on 8 April 1795. Although they were … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, Elizabethan drama, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, marriage customs, real life tales, Regency personalities, royalty, tradtions, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Death of Princess Charlotte, Signaling the End of the Hanoverian Line of Succession Was on the Horizon

The Salon: A Gathering of Elite Intellectuals, a Guest Post from Sharon Lathan

The word salon has been around since at least 1664, derived from the Italian salone or French sala, meaning “a reception room or great hall.” The indication was for a particular part of a house, a room or several rooms, where people gathered together. The English … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Living in the Regency, political stance, Regency era, world history | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Salon: A Gathering of Elite Intellectuals, a Guest Post from Sharon Lathan

Dressmaking During the Regency

Often in a Regency book, we find a situation where the woman requires a new day dress, gown, riding habit, etc. I was reading a book of late where the modiste finished several gowns in two days, but was that … Continue reading

Posted in British history, commerce, fashion, Georgian England, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments