Tag Archives: British history

Two Attempts to Assassinate King George III in a Single Day, 15 May 1800

On 15 May 1800, George III went to Hyde Park to review the 1st Foot Guards. During the review, a shot was fired which narrowly missed the King. Mr Ongley, a clerk in the Navy Office, who was standing only … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, political stance, Realm series, royalty | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Opera in Jane Austen’s London

I think you judge very wisely in putting off your London visit, and I am mistaken if it be not put off for some time. You speak with such noble resignation of Mrs. Jordan and the Opera House, that it … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Regency era, theatre | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Origin of a Sea Shantie: “What Shall We Do with the Drunken Sailor?”

“What Shall We Do with the Drunken Sailor?” was a work song, mainly sung on ships with a large number of crewmen. According to Song Facts, it is one of the oldest Anglo-Saxon sea shanties, one sung by the Indiamen … Continue reading

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Courts of Chancery, Barristers, and Solicitors

In the 15th Century, the Court of Chancery or of “equity” developed. It was under the lord high chancellor and provided an outlet for cases where results were not obtainable in the courts of common law. The courts of common … Continue reading

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John Alden’s Influence on the Release of “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

My story, “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst,” is heavily influenced by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “The Courtship of Miles Standish.” Many of the characters names, for example, derive from the poem. However, in Longfellow’s narrative, John Alden speaks to Priscilla Mullins because his … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, book release, British history, Dreamstone Publishing, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Black Monday Tragedy

 Black Monday was the Monday after Easter on 13 April 1360, during the Hundred Years’ War (1337 – 1360). The Hundred Years’ War began in 1337; by 1359, King Edward III of England was actively attempting to conquer France. In October, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Edward III, kings and queens, military | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

“Old Lady Day” ~ No It is Not My Birthday!

Quarter Days are the four dates in each year that align with religious festivals. The days are roughly three months apart and are close to the two solstices and the two equinoxes. In British history, these days were the ones … Continue reading

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Traveling by Stagecoach During the Regency Era

Stage and mail coaches traveled much faster than a private coach would do. They did not have to wait for changes, did not spend the night anywhere, and had relief drivers. Stage coaches also used their own horses, or horses under contract … Continue reading

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Thomas Tompion, “The Father of English Clockmaking”

I have a dear friend who is really into antiques, and I must tell you that she is a wealth of knowledge — a tap I often go to for just that special touch in a story, but I will … Continue reading

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Celebrating the Re-Release of “The Phantom of Pemberley: A Pride and Prejudice Mystery” Arriving Today

In 2010, Ulysses Press released The Phantom of Pemberley: A Pride and Prejudice Mystery. It was the first of my cozy mysteries, and it remains a favorite. Two years ago, I received the rights to all my Ulysses Press titles … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, British history, excerpt, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, legends, legends and myths, marriage, mystery, paranormal, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, reading habits, Regency era, royalty, spooky tales, suspense, tall tales, Ulysses Press, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments