Category Archives: titles of aristocracy

The Tale of Richard Bertie Continues, Part III

You may view the previous two posts on Richard Bertie at these links: Part I and Part II.  Briefly, Richard Bertie (ca. 1517 – 9 April 1582) was an English landowner and religious evangelical. He was the second husband of Catherine Willoughby, 12th … Continue reading

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Richard Bertie’s Attempt to Become Lord Willoughby d’Eresby ~ Part II

This post is a continuation of the one from yesterday, which introduced my readers to Richard Bertie and his unsuccessful attempt to become Lord Willoughby d’Eresby.  Richard Bertie married the widowed Duchess of Suffolk and had issue by her, a … Continue reading

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When Is a “Baron” Not a Baron?

 A “baron” is defined as the lowest rank of nobility in the British peerage system. It is a title of honor and customarily a hereditary one. That being said, the sticking point of this post is the fact the term … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Regency era, titles of aristocracy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 13 Comments

Privileges of Peers + the Release of ‘The Earl Claims His Comfort’

Privileges of a Peer During the Regency In my latest Regency romantic suspense, The Earl Claims His Comfort, there are multiple questions regarding the peerage belonging to the book’s hero. For example, can a usurper force Levison Davids, 17th Earl … Continue reading

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Could an American Inherit a Peerage? Release of “The Earl Claims His Comfort” + Excerpt & Giveaway

Could an American Inherit an English Title or Peerage? In both of my first two books from the Twins’ trilogy, the issue of whether an American could inherit a title/peerage comes into play as part of the plot. In Angel … Continue reading

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Awarding Guardianship of a Minor Child + Release of “The Earl Claims His Comfort” + Excerpt & Giveaway

In my latest Regency romantic suspense, The Earl Claims His Comfort, my main character, Levison Davids, the 17th Earl of Remmington, has been summoned home from his assignment for the Home Office upon the Continent to assume the guardianship of … Continue reading

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Princess Louise’s Charitable Work

 Although Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, and her husband, John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll were often short of funds, the Princess managed to live a life her siblings could not imagine. Campbell, who was still the Marquess of Lorne … Continue reading

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