Category Archives: writing

When Bad Things Come in Pairs: Siblings Who Wreaked Havoc in Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Amanda Kai

This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 28 May 2021. Enjoy! “Prepare for trouble. And make it double!”  While fans of the Pokemon cartoon show might associate this famous line with Team Rocket’s most inept members Jessie … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, family, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

When Might the Heir Style Himself With His New Title in Regency Romances?

First, for legal purposes, the man must present himself to the House of Lords to claim the title officially. After the will has been read and its stipulations executed, the new peer must petition the Lord Chancellor for a writ … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, buildings and structures, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, peerage, titles of aristocracy, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dogs in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

The post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 25 May 2021. Enjoy! Although (just like servants) they are often little remarked upon, dogs are everywhere in Jane Austen’s novels. In the Regency, dogs were an essential feature of countryside … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Dogs in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

Brook, New Forest, Hampshire + the Release of “Regency Mid-Summer Mischief”

My contribution to our summer anthology, “Regency Midsummer Mischief” is a tale entitled “The Jewel Thief and the Earl.” The heroine, Miss Colleen Everley, has been taught her father’s skills of being a master thief. Her father, Thomas Everley, is … Continue reading

Posted in anthology, book excerpts, book release, British history, Dreamstone Publishing, eBooks, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, publishing, reading, reading habits, Regency era, Regency romance, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Brook, New Forest, Hampshire + the Release of “Regency Mid-Summer Mischief”

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume? a Guest Post from Jann Rowland

This post initially appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 26 May 2021. Enjoy! “Haye Park might do,” said she, “if the Gouldings could quit it—or the great house at Stoke, if the drawing-room were larger; but Ashworth is too … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Pulvis Lodge, I Presume? a Guest Post from Jann Rowland

The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Novels

In James Fordyce’s Sermons to Young Women (1766), Fordyce says, “The world, I know not how, overlooks in our sex a thousand irregularities, which it never forgives in yours; so that the honour and peace of a family are, in … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, reading, research, Sense & Sensibility, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Novels

Interview with Mirta Ines Trupp and News of the Release of “Celestial Persuasion”

Mirta Ines Trupp is a member of the Austen Authors group I admin, along with Sharon Lathan. Her Austen tales come from a totally different perspective from the majority of that group, for Ms. Trupp adds her Jewish roots to … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, blog hop, book excerpts, book release, books, British history, eBooks, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Real-Life Myles Standish’s Influence on “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst”

As my previous two posts on John Alden and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow have indicated, my most recent tale, “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” was inspired by Longfellow’s narrative poem, “The Courtship of Myles Standish.” Other than the knowledge of Standish … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, book release, British Navy, eBooks, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Real-Life Myles Standish’s Influence on “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst”

John Alden’s Influence on the Release of “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

My story, “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst,” is heavily influenced by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “The Courtship of Miles Standish.” Many of the characters names, for example, derive from the poem. However, in Longfellow’s narrative, John Alden speaks to Priscilla Mullins because his … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, book release, British history, Dreamstone Publishing, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s Influence on “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

According to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: A Maine Historical Society Website, “Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was a commanding figure in the cultural life of nineteenth-century America. Born in Portland, Maine, in 1807, he became a national literary figure by the 1850s, and a … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, book release, British history, eBooks, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, marriage, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments