Category Archives: writing

Jane Austen and the Heroine’s Essential Journey, a Guest Post from Nancy Lawrence

I loved this post from fellow Austen Author, Nancy Lawrence, because of the uniqueness of the subject, an idea I had not considered previously, but because of her lovely images from Austen film adaptations (and NOT because she included links … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, film adaptations, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, reading habits, Regency era, research, Sense & Sensibility, travel, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Austen’s Use of Coincidence and Character Development, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on 22 January 2020. Enjoy!  In a recent blog, I wrote about coincidences in Jane Austen’s work. I’m following up again today with a few more examples of how she used them and how … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Emma, film adaptations, George Wickham, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, reading habits, Sense & Sensibility, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

“It Was Certainly a Very Remarkable Coincidence!” a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

“It was certainly a very remarkable coincidence!”—Northanger Abbey. Writing from roughly 1795 on, Jane Austen is usually seen as the last major writer of the 18th century. In many novels of that century, plot coincidences were not only accepted, they were … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Emma, Georgian Era, Guest Post, heroines, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Pride and Prejudice, reading habits, Regency era, Sense & Sensibility, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“Old Lady Day” ~ No It is Not My Birthday!

Quarter Days are the four dates in each year that align with religious festivals. The days are roughly three months apart and are close to the two solstices and the two equinoxes. In British history, these days were the ones … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Chaucer, Christmas, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the UK, real life tales, research, servant life, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Celebrating the Release of “Courting Lord Whitmire: A May-December Regency Romance” + a Giveaway

The hero of my latest Regency tale has spent fifteen years of his life is service to the Crown, first upon the Continent in the Napoleonic Wars and then upon the Canadian front, in what was known as Rupert’s Land, … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, military, reading habits, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

PEERAGE SUCCESSION + WELCOMING THE RELEASE OF “COURTING LORD WHITMIRE” + A GIVEAWAY

In “Courting Lord Whitmire,” there is a lengthy scene where Andrew Whitmire claims his viscountcy before the House of Lords. Although there were some exceptions to a peerage passing to the eldest son, the majority of those written about in … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, customs and tradiitons, England, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, Inheritance, Living in the Regency, publishing, Regency era, Regency romance, research, titles of aristocracy, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

The Lost Art of Letters, a Guest Post from Elaine Owen

The day after I wrote my post on Mailing Letters in the Regency, the lovely Elaine Owen shared this post on Austen Authors. I thought it appropriate to revisit this topic. This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on 3 … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, reading habits, real life tales, Regency era, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , ,