Category Archives: Pride and Prejudice

What Exactly Did It Mean for A Clergyman to Have a “Living” Bestowed Upon Him During the Regency Period?

We often read in a Regency era book something to the effect of the master of the estate bestowing a “living” upon a clergyman. Exactly, what did that entail? Once the living was bestowed, could the owner of the estate … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume? a Guest Post from Jann Rowland

This post initially appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 26 May 2021. Enjoy! “Haye Park might do,” said she, “if the Gouldings could quit it—or the great house at Stoke, if the drawing-room were larger; but Ashworth is too … Continue reading

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The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Novels

In James Fordyce’s Sermons to Young Women (1766), Fordyce says, “The world, I know not how, overlooks in our sex a thousand irregularities, which it never forgives in yours; so that the honour and peace of a family are, in … Continue reading

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Interview with Mirta Ines Trupp and News of the Release of “Celestial Persuasion”

Mirta Ines Trupp is a member of the Austen Authors group I admin, along with Sharon Lathan. Her Austen tales come from a totally different perspective from the majority of that group, for Ms. Trupp adds her Jewish roots to … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, blog hop, book excerpts, book release, books, British history, eBooks, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Mr. Darcy Is Too “Proud.” But Is Darcy the Only Character Who Is Too Proud in Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”?

As most of you are likely to realize by now, I am a “whole brained” individual, which means that although I adore the fine arts, I still possess a very analytical brain. You’ll find me solving word puzzles and sodokus … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, excerpt, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, marriage customs, marriage licenses, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency romance, romance | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

A Character Study of Charlotte Lucas, a Guest Post from Lelia Eye

This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 8 April 2021. I thought those here might enjoy the close examination many writers of Jane Austen Fan Fiction take before placing pen to paper. Ms. Eye is one of … Continue reading

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Regency Era Con Man, Gregor McGregor and “Mr. Darcy’s Bargain”

In writing my Austen-inspired vagary, Mr. Darcy’s Bargain, I researched LOTS of scams of the Regency era. One of the most prolific of those who practiced a scheme to defraud others was a Scot named Gregor McGregor. Gregor McGregor was … Continue reading

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Easter During the Regency

According to many sources, for many years during the Regency (1811-1820), Parliament did not open its first session of the year until after Easter. But the list of dates, I have included below, contradicts that idea somewhat. Generally, the new … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, England, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

March 25, Lady Day – What are the Quarter Days in UK?

In the Western liturgical year, Lady Day is the traditional name in some English-speaking countries of the Feast of the Annunciation, which is celebrated on 25 March, and commemorates the visit of the archangel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, during … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, holidays, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, medieval, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on March 25, Lady Day – What are the Quarter Days in UK?

Celebrating the Re-Release of “The Phantom of Pemberley: A Pride and Prejudice Mystery” Arriving Today

In 2010, Ulysses Press released The Phantom of Pemberley: A Pride and Prejudice Mystery. It was the first of my cozy mysteries, and it remains a favorite. Two years ago, I received the rights to all my Ulysses Press titles … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, British history, excerpt, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, legends, legends and myths, marriage, mystery, paranormal, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, reading habits, Regency era, royalty, spooky tales, suspense, tall tales, Ulysses Press, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments