Category Archives: music

Buying a Commission During the Regency Era

In times of peace and of war, most promotions were achieved by purchasing a higher rank, rather than earning a field promotion, so to speak. This made it easy for a man to have a high rank without much actual … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, music, Napoleonic Wars, Northanger Abbey, political stance, Regency era, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Ben Jonson’s “Song to Celia” ~ The Poem You Did Not Know Was a Song

 One of my favorite love songs comes to us from the poet Ben Jonson. According to Poets.org, “The poet, essayist, and playwright Ben Jonson was born on June 11, 1572 in London, England. In 1598, Jonson wrote what is considered his … Continue reading

Posted in British history, literature, love quotes, music, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Award Winning Love Songs Just in Time for Valentine’s Day

As we are in the midst of award programs, and it is Valentine’s Day, let’s go back to the songs that made us fall in love. These are some of my LONG-time favorites.  Today, I offer you an “evergreen” post. … Continue reading

Posted in acting, film, holidays, music | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Origin of a Sea Shantie: “What Shall We Do with the Drunken Sailor?”

“What Shall We Do with the Drunken Sailor?” was a work song, mainly sung on ships with a large number of crewmen. According to Song Facts, it is one of the oldest Anglo-Saxon sea shanties, one sung by the Indiamen … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British history, British Navy, music, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Men of Harlech (Rhyfelgyrch Gwŷr Harlech), a Welsh Military March

 “Men of Harlech” (Rhyfelgyrch Gwŷr Harlech) is a traditional military march and is said to chronicle the seven-year long siege of Harlech Castle in the 1460s. The incident is considered the longest known siege in British history. The garrison was commanded … Continue reading

Posted in ballads, British history, film, legends, military, music, Wales | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Christmas Carols Jane Austen Might Have Known, a Guest Post from Jann Rowland

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors in December 2016. I thought you might enjoy it, given the time of the year.  As anyone who knows me will attest, I love music, and I also love Christmas. But while do … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Saxons, British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Living in the Regency, music | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Christmas Carols Jane Austen Might Have Known, a Guest Post from Jann Rowland

Finding Sheet Music During the Regency Era

Although quite expensive, sheet music was readily available during the Regency era. Many a person subscribed to services offered by music publishers, among the Schirmer, the most well known of the time. Sheet music was produced for subscribers in bound … Continue reading

Posted in ballads, British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Jane Austen, music, Napoleonic Wars | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Finding Sheet Music During the Regency Era

The Origins of the “Irish” Ballad, “Danny Boy”

Okay, I admit it. “Danny Boy” is one of my favorite songs, but it is not because I am Irish (which I am, for I have strong Irish roots in my ancestral tree). I simply think that the melody of … Continue reading

Posted in ballads, British history, customs and tradiitons, England, history, Ireland, music, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

George Thomson, Savior of British Traditional Music

“The Maid of Llanwellyn” is a Welsh song of love in which the girl admits she has no care for whether her lover is rich or not. From Contemplator [You may listen to the music on this site.] we learn, “This … Continue reading

Posted in ballads, British history, Georgian Era, music, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

The Tradition of “Christmas Carols”

Parts of this post were originally featured on Austen Authors, brought to us from Rebecca Jamison. I have added to what she shared and offer more of the history of the Christmas Carols than she did in her original post, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Christmas, music, tradtions | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments