Monthly Archives: March 2018

Annulments, Divorces, Criminal Conversation: Debunking Historical Myths for Writers

  First, permit me to say that in the Regency period, divorces were few. They were expensive. The Church of England opposed divorce as vehemently as did the Roman Catholic church. The Church of England only permitted a “legal separation,” … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, American History, British history, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Jane Austen and the Casualties of War, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

Jane Austen had two brothers who served in the navy, Frank and Charles, and two who served in the militia, Edward and Henry. Father George Austen and brother James, as clergymen, were discouraged from bearing arms but recruited soldiers and … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, military | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Welcoming Jennifer Redlarczyk and Her Release of “A Very Merry Mix-up”

 Today I welcome a dear friend of this blog and of Austen Authors. Jennifer Redlarczyk, who is releasing a novelette as a prelude to her first novel, Darcy’s Melody, which will arrive soon.  Austen fans are in for a real … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, excerpt, film adaptations, Georgian England, Guest Post, historical fiction, Jane Austen, legends and myths, Living in the Regency, music, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 58 Comments

The Duchess of Richmond’s Ball and Waterloo, a Guest Post from Jann Rowland

On June 15, 1815, perhaps the most famous (or infamous) ball in history was held. The Duchess of Richmond’s ball is generally regarded as the event in which Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington, was informed of the advance of French … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, Great Britain, Guest Post, Ireland, Living in the Regency, Napoleonic Wars, Regency era, research, war | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Admiral Croft’s Gout in Austen’s “Persuasion” and How to Cure It…

In Chapter 18 of Jane Austen’s Persuasion, Mary Musgrove writes to her sister Anne Elliot of their father’s tenants, the Crofts. “I have this moment heard that the Crofts are going to Bath almost immediately: they think the Admiral gouty.” … Continue reading

Posted in Austen actors, food and drink, Georgian England, herbs, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, medicine, Persuasion | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Falling into Easy Writing Traps: Do You Know These Rules?

 (image via 4 Common Academic Writing Mistakes and How to Fix Them from http://www.noodle.com) Falling Into Easy Writing Traps… 1.  The word “hold” is confusing to some. Essentially a person can hold a baby, a spoon, a smart phone, etc., … Continue reading

Posted in books, editing, Industry News/Publishing, language choices, manuscript evaluation, publishing, vocabulary, word choices, word play, writing | 8 Comments

The Age of Consent to Marry in the Regency Period

During the Regency, despite what some authors may include within the story line, the age of consent for females was twenty-one, not twenty-five as some would lead the reader to believe. Although I do not know from where the idea … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Gretna Green, Living in the Regency, marriage licenses, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , | 22 Comments