Category Archives: Great Britain

March 25, Lady Day – What are the Quarter Days in UK?

In the Western liturgical year, Lady Day is the traditional name in some English-speaking countries of the Feast of the Annunciation, which is celebrated on 25 March, and commemorates the visit of the archangel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, during … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, holidays, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, medieval, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on March 25, Lady Day – What are the Quarter Days in UK?

Cozy Up to an Austen-Inspired Mystery with the ReRelease of “The Phantom of Pemberley”

The Phantom of Pemberley: A Pride and Prejudice Mystery was my sixth Jane Austen book. It was originally released in 2010 by Ulysses Press. As Ulysses no longer publishes fiction stories, I had my rights to the book returned to … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, Georgian England, gothic and paranormal, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, language choices, legends and myths, Living in the Regency, mystery, Regency era, Ulysses Press | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

The Succession That Led to the Victorian Era

The Encyclopedia Britannica defines the Salic Law of Succession as “the rule by which, in certain sovereign dynasties, persons descended from a previous sovereign only through a woman were excluded from succession to the throne. Gradually formulated in France, the … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, George IV, Georgian, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, political stance, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Burning of Washington City in 1814 by the British + the Release of “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

After their first capture of Napoleon, the British turned their sights on the American front and what was known as the War of 1812. Up until that time, the British had been too busy with Napoleon to address fully the … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book release, British history, British Navy, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, military, Regency era, War of 1812 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Burning of Washington City in 1814 by the British + the Release of “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

The Battle of the Thames’s Role in “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

The Battle of the Thames during the War of 1812 proved to be an important American victory in what was known, at the time, as Upper Canada, for it allowed the Americans to combine its control of the Northwest territory. … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book release, British history, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, military, reading habits, real life tales, Regency romance, research, War of 1812, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Battle of the Thames’s Role in “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

Banking and Bank Notes in Georgian England

The 18th Century saw the roots of modern day banking in England. International trade and the various wars, most importantly, the war with France, led to the development of the British banking system. Checks and banknotes appeared, as well as … Continue reading

Posted in British currency, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Peerage Law in Georgian England

TITLES (IN DISPUTE): One could not renounce an English title.  In the mid 20th century,  a law was passed allowing a man to disclaim a title he had not yet taken up. However, the title became “dormant,” and no one … Continue reading

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Enlisting in the British Army During the Regency Era

Being an officer in the British Army was considered a “suitable” occupation for sons of peers and wealthy families of the gentry. Generally, the head of the family (father, uncle, brother, etc. would purchase commissions for his relation. We often … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, military, real life tales, Regency era, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Widow’s Stipend, Jointures, Dower, Settlements, and Dowry. Which is Which in the Regency?

  English Common Law provided a widow a life interest in one-third of the freehold lands her husband owned at the time of their marriage. She could not be denied these rights unless she was found guilty of treason, felony, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, estates, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Inheritance, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, Sense & Sensibility, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Performing as an Officer and a Gentleman While Being Broke

Of late, I have been reading of a phenomenon going on, specifically during the Napoleonic Wars, that I am certain many of my readers are unaware. Officers often “fronted” the cost of the men serving under them and returned home … Continue reading

Posted in British history, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, military, Napoleonic Wars | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments