Category Archives: word origins

Early History of the Oxford English Dictionary

Several times per week, I am looking at the OED (Oxford English Dictionary) for word origins or synonyms or a variety of other searches. Yet, until recently, I had not thought much about this fabulous resource’s beginnings. It took from … Continue reading

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Pride and Prejudice and Nuance, a Guest Post from Leila Eye

Whenever you start to become a fan of something, that’s when you tend to pay attention to the nuances and all of the details involved. You start placing more importance on what makes something different rather than just what you … Continue reading

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Using Cradles Through The Ages

We all likely know something of “Rock-a-bye Baby“ as a nursery rhyme and lullaby. The melody is a variant of the song comes from an English satirical ballad called ‘Lillibullero,‘ a march that became popular in England at the time of … Continue reading

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Rites of Mourning and the Recent Release of “Where There’s a FitzWILLiam Darcy, There’s a Way”

The mourning rites we customarily think of as being so strict during the Regency era, were actually those imposed by Queen Victoria after the death of her husband, Prince Albert. Victoria was known to wear black for many years and … Continue reading

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Rotten Row: How This Fashionable Place Earned Such an Unusual Name?

During the Regency Era one of the places to see and be seen was a broad stretch of track running along the south side of Hyde Park in London. It was known as Rotten Row, not a very enticing name … Continue reading

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Deamed (or) Deemed (or) Damned (or) Dammed? To Curse or Not to Curse…

Periodically in a story set in the Regency era, the occasion arises where a curse word would be appropriate for a character. However, how to use that word and who might utter it remains a decision most authors of the … Continue reading

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Author’s “Voice” ~ What is It?

Writers often hear another author warn them about losing their “voice.” But what exactly is “voice”? In reality, there are so many theories on this question that I could be here for years debating them all. I am of the … Continue reading

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Words that “Snarl” and Words that “Purr”

My undergraduate degree was a comprehensive major (no minor) that covered English, speech, journalism, and theatre. As such, many years ago, I came across these terms: snarl-words and purr-words in a book on rhetoric that was one of my textbooks. … Continue reading

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Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

Go Through Fire and Water ~ English for Students tells us, “Go through fire and water means to face any peril. This phrase originally referred to the medieval practice of trial by ordeal which could take the form of making an accused … Continue reading

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Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

 Jumping the Broom/Broomstick – This is a ceremony dating back to the 1600s and derived from Africa. Dating back to slave days, jumping the broom together has been part of weddings for couples who want to honor that tradition. It also … Continue reading

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