Tag Archives: language choices

Pride and Prejudice and Nuance, a Guest Post from Leila Eye

Whenever you start to become a fan of something, that’s when you tend to pay attention to the nuances and all of the details involved. You start placing more importance on what makes something different rather than just what you … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, language choices, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, Regency era, word choices, word origins, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Pride and Prejudice and Nuance, a Guest Post from Leila Eye

Colorful, Colored, and Colorless Words: Fixing Writing Errors

Do you recall the dreaded 500-words’ essay often assigned by English teachers? Do you also recall the sinking feeling of coming up with 500 words on a subject for which you held no opinion? Do you also recall writing something … Continue reading

Posted in eBooks, editing, language choices, publishing, word choices, word choices, word play, writing | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

These are some of the words and phrases I have encountered of late while reading. Some I knew the meaning and some I did not. Even when I knew the meaning, I was interested in the word’s origin or how … Continue reading

Posted in language choices, vocabulary, word choices, word choices, word origins, word play | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Regency Era Lexicon – We Are Up to “H”

Regency Era Lexicon – Time for the Letter “H” Haberdasher – a man who dealt with small items for sewing, such as thread, needles, buttons, ribbons, etc. Hack – a general-purpose riding horse; not used for hunting or military purposes … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Regency Era Lexicon – Next Up is the Letter “G”

Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Up to “G” Gaiters – knee-high leggings that buttoned on the side; a master would wear these over his clothing to protect them from mud, dirt, and rain Gallery – a long narrow room in … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Regency Era Lexicon – “F” is for More Than “Failure”

Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Up to “F” fag – used in English public schools; denoted a younger boy who ran errands for an older student (to become “fatigued” by doing these errands) faggot – a grouping of sticks tied … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Regency Era Lexicon – “E” is Next on Our List

Regency Era Lexicon – The Fifth Letter is “E” Earnest Money – the first installment of a financial bargain; often the master of a household hiring a servant at a hiring fair offered earnest money to secure the person’s services … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Writers Require Precision in Language Choices

Originally published on Savvy Authors on November 8, 2011 Precision in Language Choices Choosing the precise word or phrase remains a challenge for all authors, whether they write professionally or for their own pleasure. The majority of those who make … Continue reading

Posted in holidays, Jane Austen, language choices, Pride and Prejudice, word play, writing | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Writers Require Precision in Language Choices

Editing 101: Words Frequently Confused (Part 2)

Most writers enjoy games that test their knowledge of word skills. Yet, knowing which word or phrase to choose can be a challenge even for those of us who consider ourselves “word” worshippers. Are you aware of the distinctions listed … Continue reading

Posted in editing, language choices, word play, writing | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

From Where Does That Phrase Come? A Bit of Slang

Slang, consists of a lexicon of non-standard words and phrases in a given language. Use of these words and phrases is typically associated with the subversion of a standard variety (such as Standard English) and is likely to be interpreted … Continue reading

Posted in language choices, Pop Culture, word play, writing | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments