Category Archives: vocabulary

Life Below Stairs, Part 5 – The “Fallen” Female Servant

The life of a female servant in an English household of the 18th or 19th Century was a lonely one in terms of romantic entanglements, and we can only imagine how easily such a woman might be tempted to “taste” … Continue reading

Posted in British history, commerce, Georgian England, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Regency era, romance, servant life, vocabulary | Tagged , , , , , | 9 Comments

Rotten Row: How This Fashionable Place Earned Such an Unusual Name?

During the Regency Era one of the places to see and be seen was a broad stretch of track running along the south side of Hyde Park in London. It was known as Rotten Row, not a very enticing name … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, real life tales, research, travel, vocabulary, word origins | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Falling into Easy Writing Traps: Do You Know These Rules?

 (image via 4 Common Academic Writing Mistakes and How to Fix Them from http://www.noodle.com) Falling Into Easy Writing Traps… 1.  The word “hold” is confusing to some. Essentially a person can hold a baby, a spoon, a smart phone, etc., … Continue reading

Posted in books, editing, Industry News/Publishing, language choices, manuscript evaluation, publishing, vocabulary, word choices, word play, writing | 8 Comments

Sir Walter Scott, the Historical Romance, and the Creation of a National Identity – Part II

Recently, we had our first look at how Sir Walter Scott perfected the “formula” for historical romance while creating a national identity. [June 8, Part I]  Sir Walter Scott’s fiction quite often uses the plot devices of inheritance and lineage. … Continue reading

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Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

Inexpressibles ~ Etymology Compare to unmentionables ‎(“underwear”). Geri Walton at her Unique Histories from the 18th and 19th Centuries tells us “That part of the dress which it is now unlawful to name, seems of old to have had the … Continue reading

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Are You Familiar With These Words and Phrases?

Spillikin ~ The Oxford Living Dictionaries gives us: [treated as singular] A game played with a heap of small rods of wood, bone, or plastic, in which players try to remove one at a time without disturbing the others, while Wikitionary … Continue reading

Posted in etymology, language choices, Pop Culture, tall tales, vocabulary, word choices, word origins | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Author’s Voice

Years ago, when I was still beating my head against the wall while teaching English in the public classrooms of three different states, I attempted repeatedly to explain “author voice” to my students. I encouraged my students to write with … Continue reading

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Are You Familiar with These Words and Phrases?

The words and phrases below are ones I can across in a “more traditional” Regency romance I was reading leisurely, and thought I would share some of the less common ones. Enjoy! Here and Thereian is one who has no … Continue reading

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Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

Dead as a Doornail. The “doornail” is the plate or knocker upon which the hammer of a door knocker strikes. Phrases.org gives us this explanation on the origin of the phrase. In 1350,  William Langland used the phrase in a translation … Continue reading

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Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

These are some of the words and phrases I have encountered of late while reading. Some I knew the meaning and some I did not. Even when I knew the meaning, I was interested in the word’s origin or how … Continue reading

Posted in language choices, vocabulary, word choices, word choices, word origins, word play | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment