Tag Archives: England

Smuggling as a Plot Point in My Latest Release, “Lady Chandler’s Sister, Book 3 of the Twins’s Trilogy” + a Giveaway

 One of the “cottage” industries of the late 1700s and early 1800s in England and Scotland was smuggling. This was not just a single individual stealing a keg or two and then selling it to his neighbors; these were operations … Continue reading

Posted in Black Opal Books, book excerpts, book release, British history, eBooks, England, excerpt, food and drink, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, Great Britain, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, political stance, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, Scotland, tea | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Celebrating the Release of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy” with an Excerpt + a Giveaway

Today, I celebrate the release of Lady Chandler’s Sister, the third book in the Twins’ trilogy, a romantic suspense set in 1820 England, five years after the end of the Napoleonic War and the first year on the throne for … Continue reading

Posted in Black Opal Books, book excerpts, book release, British history, eBooks, excerpt, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, marriage, marriage licenses, political stance, publishing, Regency era, Regency romance, research, romance, Scotland, suspense, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

The Tradition of “Christmas Carols”

Parts of this post were originally featured on Austen Authors, brought to us from Rebecca Jamison. I have added to what she shared and offer more of the history of the Christmas Carols than she did in her original post, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Christmas, music, tradtions | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Putting History in Historical Fiction, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on 12 July 2018. Ernest Hemingway once said: “If a writer knows enough about what he is writing about, he may omit things that he knows. … The dignity of movement of an … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, eBooks, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, historical fiction, Jane Austen, publishing, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Very “Real” Estate: Vicars’ Close, Wells, Somerset, England

The oldest purely residential street in England is known as Vicars’ Close, which is located in Wells, Somerset, England, and dates from the mid 14th Century.  Planned by Bishop Ralph of Shrewsbury, at one time it was 42 separate houses, … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, British history, buildings and structures, customs and tradiitons, England, Great Britain, history, medieval, research | Tagged , , , , , , ,

UK “Real” Estate: Coggeshall Abbey in Essex

In 1140, Coggeshall Abbey was founded by King Stephen and his wife Matilda as a Sauvignac Abbey.. It was designed to house the monks of the Savigniac order. The earliest English use of bricks as building materials can be found … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Chaucer, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, buildings and structures, history | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Special Licences in Regency Era

In 1753, the Hardwick Marriage Act passed, and Georgian couples in England and Wales could choose among three ways to marry: with the reading of the banns, by a common (sometimes referred to as an “ordinary”) licence, and by special … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Levirate marriage, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, Regency era, Wales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments