Monthly Archives: August 2019

Playing Cards in Jane Austen’s England, Pleasant Pastime, as Well as Gambling

… the undeniably romantic allure of the richly decorated gaming clubs or the reckless gambling of dynastic fortunes [which] rather trump[s] the dingy and dull penny games played against street walls or in alehouses. (Arthur Pitt, MA dissertation, A Study Of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, quotes, Regency era, Regency romance, research, Sense & Sensibility, Whigs | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Loving Mr. Bennet, a Guest Post from Jann Rowland

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on June 26, 2019. Enjoy!  I’ve always liked Mr. Bennet as a character in Pride and Prejudice. He’s sarcastic and funny, he provides several priceless moments, and is Elizabeth’s true supporter, sometimes in direct … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage, Pride and Prejudice, reading, reading habits, Regency era, Regency romance, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Barristers and Solicitors During the Regency Era

Previously, I did a post about barristers, solicitors, and lawyers, but I have had a few questions come up since then, so I am going to repeat some of what I had written back on April 12, 2017, but add … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, Regency era, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Colours of the Regency

   In my novella, “Last Woman Standing,” which is to be a part of a Christmas anthology, the heroine’s father is a horticulturalist. He has an unusual monkey flower species called the “Calico” in the book. In case you are interested, … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, Regency era, research, writing | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

The Significance of Birth Order in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on June 25, 2019. Enjoy!  Birth order has an impact on your personality and behaviour, according to many psychologists. Some of the stereotypes related to sibling birth order have primarily been confirmed by … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, customs and tradiitons, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, reading, real life tales, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What is the Difference Between a Peerage That is “Dormant,” “Extinct” or in “Abeyance”?

I was recently looking for names and titles to use for characters in a list of extinct  and abeyant peerages in an online copy of  Debrett’s from the mid 1800s. Some of the titles in abeyance had been in that state since the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, Inheritance, kings and queens, Living in the Regency, peerage, real life tales, Regency romance, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Was the “Ton” or the “Bon Ton” a More Appropriate Descriptor to Call the Aristocracy During the Regency Era?

Le bon ton is a French phrase meaning “the good style” or “good form.” So one could be part of the ton, if one had the style for it, which is why Beau Brummell could be a leader of fashion … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, political stance, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , ,