Category Archives: history

“Murder of a Bastard Child,” an Historical Crime Against Children

In the 18th Century in England, what was the fate of a child born to a young woman pregnant out of wedlock? Alan Taylor in the British History Georgian Lives Facebook Group tells us, “The most common capital offence for … Continue reading

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The “Churching” of Women After Childbirth

 Although it has largely fallen out of favor with Western religion, the concept of “churching” in the Church of England can be traced well into the 20th Century. (Margaret Houlbrooke. Rite out of Time: a Study of the Ancient Rite of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, England, Great Britain, history, Living in the UK, marriage, marriage customs, medicine, religion, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Female Inheritance and the Release of “The Mistress of Rosings Park” + a Giveaway

Under English law, women were subordinate to their husbands. It was expected that the woman was under the “protection and influence of her husband, her baron, or lord.” The law stated the old adage of “two shall become one.” She … Continue reading

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When Was a Presentation of a “Living” Not for Life? + Release of “The Mistress of Rosings Park” + a Giveaway

One of my editors for The Mistress of Rosings Park presented me a question that I thought I should address to all, not just to her. In my story, Mr. Darcy assumes control of Rosings Park after the death of … Continue reading

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“First Footing” It Into the New Year

I come very proud Scots, and, in my family, New Year’s (or Hogmanay as it was once called) played a popular part of my childhood. Although I admit to overspending at Christmas, something psychological as being raised poor, I am … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Saxons, British history, Christmas, Church of England, Great Britain, history, Living in the UK, medieval, real life tales, religion, research, Scotland, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Celebrating the Release of “Fated Hearts, A Love After All Retelling of the Scottish Play” and the Gift of a Happily Ever After for Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”

Fated Hearts, A Love After All Retelling of the Scottish Play Release Day: December 29, 2020 Thank you so much for having me as a guest today, Regina!  My contribution to the Tragic Characters in Classic Literature Series is a … Continue reading

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Tidbits Regarding Some of Your Favorite Christmas Traditions

Below are some facts associated with Christmas, but are rarely mentioned in common conversation. Did you know… Sir Henry Cole was the first to send out a Christmas card. The year was 1843. Cole bemoaned the number of letters he … Continue reading

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December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent, Ending the Last War Between the United States and the UK

On December 24, 1814, British and American diplomates signed the Treaty of Ghent, bringing about an end to the War of 1812, the only war in which America and the United Kingdom took aim at each other. In the War of … Continue reading

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Yorkshire Christmas Traditions Playing Out in “Letters from Home” and “Lady Joy and the Earl”

Christmas traditions in Yorkshire date back to the time of the Roman invasion. For example, documentation shows that a celebration dedicated to Saturn, the god of harvest and agriculture, took place somewhere between December 17 and December 25 in York … Continue reading

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Celebrating the Release of “I Shot the Sheriff: A Tragic Characters in Classic Lit Series Novel” with a Who Is Who in the Tale

I Shot the Sheriff: Tragic Characters in Classic Literature Series Novel  How does one reform the infamous Sheriff of Nottingham? Easy. With Patience. William de Wendenal, the notorious Sheriff of Nottingham, has come to London, finally having wormed his way … Continue reading

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