Category Archives: history

Celebrating the Release of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy” with an Excerpt + a Giveaway

Today, I celebrate the release of Lady Chandler’s Sister, the third book in the Twins’ trilogy, a romantic suspense set in 1820 England, five years after the end of the Napoleonic War and the first year on the throne for … Continue reading

Posted in Black Opal Books, book excerpts, book release, British history, eBooks, excerpt, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, marriage, marriage licenses, political stance, publishing, Regency era, Regency romance, research, romance, Scotland, suspense, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Irish Agrarian Societies: The Ribbonmen, Part of the Plot of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy”

Whiteboyism, the subject of Monday’s post, essentially ceased to operate toward the end of the eighteenth century, although it never truly disappeared, for it resurrected its head in the Munster region (Counties Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary, and Waterford) in … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, Church of England, estates, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Ireland, Living in the Regency, political stance, real life tales, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Irish Castles in Ruins: Research for My Next Release, “Lady Chandler’s Sister”

In book 3 of my Twins’ Trilogy, entitled Lady Chandler’s Sister, the ruins of an Irish castle play out in the book’s conclusion. Therefore, I spent time looking for the right image before I wrote those final scenes. As with … Continue reading

Posted in book release, buildings and structures, castles, eBooks, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, Ireland, Living in the Regency, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, romance, Scotland, trilogy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Letters and Diaries of Henrietta Liston, a Regency Lady with an Extraordinary Life, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

(This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on November 3, 2018. Enjoy!) I recently had the pleasure of attending a meeting of the Jane Austen Society of the United Kingdom – Scottish Branch, featuring a fascinating talk by … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Austen Authors, British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, marriage, publishing, reading, reading habits, real life tales, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

London Run Riot: The Overt Politics of Austen’s Gothic Romp, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

(This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on November 1, 2018. Enjoy!)  During Jane Austen’s life and beyond, England was beset with constant internal strife—labor protests, political riots, and military mutinies. These came as the result of falling … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Northanger Abbey, real life tales, Regency era, research, world history, writing | Tagged , , , , , ,

Gretna Green: Secret Engagements, Elopements and the World’s Most Famous Anvil, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

(This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on December 1, 2017. Enjoy!)                   After many years in my “to visit” list, I finally had the chance to make it to … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Gretna Green, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, legends, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, Pride and Prejudice | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Being a “Gentleman” in Regency England

 In 1583 Sir Thomas Smith wrote: “One who can live idly and without manual labour and will bear the port (deportment) and countenance of a gentleman, he shall be taken for a gentleman.” But what does “being a gentleman” entail? … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, George Wickham, Georgian England, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, primogenture, Regency era | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments