Category Archives: Anglo-Saxons

Dukes: a Dime a Dozen… British Peerages

Those of us who write historical romances love our dukes. We create them left and right. I have two, which is not a large number when one considers I have 50 novels available: Brantley Fowler from A Touch of Velvet: … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, kings and queens, legacy, Living in the UK, peerage, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Allure of ByGone Days…(or Not)

(In cleaning out some of my school files, I came across these common phrases and their sources. Enjoy!!!) Here are some bygone tales about the 1500s: People married in June. Most had taken their yearly bath in May, so the bride … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, Great Britain, real life tales, tall tales | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

The Common Practice of Primogeniture in Regency England

Of late, I have been studying the laws and statutes that comprised the practice of primogeniture in Regency England. In truth, I can only work on the project for a few hours each day for some of the material is … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, Anglo-Saxons, British history, business, commerce, Georgian England, history, Living in the Regency, marriage customs, primogenture, Scotland, titles of aristocracy, Wales | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Pre-Elizabethan Drama: Morality Plays

Previously, I did a piece on Liturgical Drama. Today I would like to look at Moralities. As compared to the Miracle or Liturgical dramas, the morality play was one where the playwright had to come up with an original story … Continue reading

Posted in acting, Age of Chaucer, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, drama, medieval, playwrights, Vagary | Tagged , , , , ,

Very “Real” Estate ~ Edwinstowe, Nottinghamshire ~ Church for Robin Hood and Maid Marian’s Wedding???

 In 633 A. D., King Edwin of Northumbria (King of Deira and Bernicia), a Saxon, whose kingdom at the time stretched from the River Trent, which marks the boundary between the Midlands and the north of England, to Edinburgh (Edwin’s borough), … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Saxons, British history, buildings and structures, kings and queens, legends and myths, medieval | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Colchester and Colchester Castle, Oldest Recorded Town and the Largest Keep in England

Colchester, some 50 miles northeast of London, is an historic market town in the county of Essex. As the oldest recorded Roman town in Britain, Colchester is claimed to be the oldest town in Britain. For a time, it was … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British currency, British history, buildings and structures | Tagged , , , , ,

UK “Real” Estate: Coggeshall Abbey in Essex

In 1140, Coggeshall Abbey was founded by King Stephen and his wife Matilda as a Sauvignac Abbey.. It was designed to house the monks of the Savigniac order. The earliest English use of bricks as building materials can be found … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Chaucer, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, buildings and structures, history | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Growth of Hampstead in 19th Century England

Hampstead is one of the villages that surrounded 19th Century London, but the village was founded long before that time. Founded during the Anglo-Saxon period, its name translates to “homestead.” Early records shows a grant by King Ethelred the Unready … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Saxons, British history, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Shetland Sword Dance

 Sir Walter Scott wrote in his diary of the Shetland Sword Dance on 7 August 1814. “At Scalloway my curiosity was gratified by an account of the sword-dance, now almost lost, but still practiced in the Island of Papa…. There … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, drama, literature, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the Last of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence to Pass

Charles Carroll was born on September 19, 1737, into a prominent Roman Catholic family in Annapolis, Maryland. Charles Carroll of Annapolis, the father of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, was born in 1703, and died in 1783. He was a wealthy landowner … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Saxons, British history, Declaration of Independence, Georgian England | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments