Tag Archives: idioms

The Allure of ByGone Days…(or Not)

(In cleaning out some of my school files, I came across these common phrases and their sources. Enjoy!!!) Here are some bygone tales about the 1500s: People married in June. Most had taken their yearly bath in May, so the bride … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, Great Britain, real life tales, tall tales | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

The Lovely World of the English Language ~ Do You Know These Idioms?

Are you like me? Do you wonder from where a particular phrase originates? I am often in a position to search out a phrase or a word to determine whether it is too modern for my writings set in the … Continue reading

Posted in word choices, word origins, word play | Tagged , , , | 18 Comments

Do You Know the Origin of These Words and Phrases?

Do You Know The Origin of These Words and Phrases? I have been editing again, as well as judging a few writing contests. The process had me searching out some of the least common words and phrases I encountered. Check … Continue reading

Posted in editing, etymology, language choices, vocabulary, word choices, word choices, word origins, word play, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

I was reading a period piece recently and came across the words and phrases below. How many of these do you use? Verge – British: A grass edging such as that by the side of a road or path Embarazo – … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era, Victorian era, word play | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

From Where Does That Phrase Come?

This first one is for Brian, who spoke of a preference for the word in one of my recent posts. Codswallop ~ Unknown, attested from 1959 episode of UK TV series Hancock’s Half Hour. The writers (Galton and Simpson) state that … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, legends and myths, Uncategorized, word play | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

From Where Does That Phrase Come?

Catch Word is a word under the right-hand side of the last line on a book page that repeats the first word on the following page – circa 1736. It was commonly used in printing. The phrase has come into … Continue reading

Posted in customs and tradiitons, language choices, word play, writing | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

From Where Does That Phrase Come? A Bit of Slang

Slang, consists of a lexicon of non-standard words and phrases in a given language. Use of these words and phrases is typically associated with the subversion of a standard variety (such as Standard English) and is likely to be interpreted … Continue reading

Posted in language choices, Pop Culture, word play, writing | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

From Where Does That Phrase Come?

Recently, I was checking the source of several key phrases within my current WIP (Work in Progress), a cozy mystery, checking to discover whether the word/phrase would have been used in Regency England. Below, are some of those I researched. … Continue reading

Posted in editing, language choices, word play, writing | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

From Where Does that Phrase Come?

I am fascinated by the origin of common phrases. Her are some of my favorites, ones I have used repeatedly over the years. Add yours to the list, and we will see if we can find their sources. the apple … Continue reading

Posted in language choices, word play, writing | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

The Wonderful World of the English Language: From Where Does That Phrase Come?

Do you wonder from where words originate? From whom they originate? Try some of these on for fun. They would make great story starters at a party. LOL! Ketchup: Ketchup was originally a sauce composed of the juices of edible … Continue reading

Posted in language choices, word play, writing | Tagged , , | 2 Comments