Tag Archives: word choice

Deamed (or) Deemed (or) Damned (or) Dammed? To Curse or Not to Curse…

Periodically in a story set in the Regency era, the occasion arises where a curse word would be appropriate for a character. However, how to use that word and who might utter it remains a decision most authors of the … Continue reading

Posted in editing, Georgian England, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, Regency era, word choices, word origins, writing | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

Words that “Snarl” and Words that “Purr”

My undergraduate degree was a comprehensive major (no minor) that covered English, speech, journalism, and theatre. As such, many years ago, I came across these terms: snarl-words and purr-words in a book on rhetoric that was one of my textbooks. … Continue reading

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Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

Go Through Fire and Water ~ English for Students tells us, “Go through fire and water means to face any peril. This phrase originally referred to the medieval practice of trial by ordeal which could take the form of making an accused … Continue reading

Posted in etymology, word choices, word origins, word play | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Author’s Voice

Years ago, when I was still beating my head against the wall while teaching English in the public classrooms of three different states, I attempted repeatedly to explain “author voice” to my students. I encouraged my students to write with … Continue reading

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Colorful, Colored, and Colorless Words: Fixing Writing Errors

Do you recall the dreaded 500-words’ essay often assigned by English teachers? Do you also recall the sinking feeling of coming up with 500 words on a subject for which you held no opinion? Do you also recall writing something … Continue reading

Posted in eBooks, editing, language choices, publishing, word choices, word choices, word play, writing | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Are You Familiar with These Phrases and Words?

Today we will look at phrases/words we have inherited from England. Go to the Dickens! (or) What the Dickens! Believe it or not, neither phrase has anything to do with the Victorian novelist, Charles Dickens. Actually, “dickens” comes to us … Continue reading

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Do You Know The Origin of These Words and Phrases?

Three Sheets to the Wind – Urban Dictionary defines this phrase to mean “to be explicitly drunk; inebriated.” The origin is likely found in practicality: Sheets actually refer to the ropes that are used to secure a ship’s sail. If the … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Chaucer, Canterbury tales, etymology, history, Jane Austen, real life tales, tall tales, word choices, word origins, word play, writing | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments