Category Archives: Industrial Revolution

“Luminous” Blog Tour ~ Worker Compensation Laws and the Radium Girls, a Guest Post from Samantha Wilcoxson

Many people do not realize how much we owe to the dial painters in 1920’s radium studios for our modern workers’ compensation laws. The idea that workers should be protected from harm and that companies were liable for damages to … Continue reading

Posted in American History, blog hop, book release, British history, eBooks, Guest Post, history, Industrial Revolution, medicine, publishing, reading habits, real life tales, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Stagecoach Travel During the Regency

It was the late 1700s before the roads were in good enough shape to support coach travel. People until that time were of the nature to ride a horse or walk. Goods were placed upon pack horses. The roads were … Continue reading

Posted in British history, business, Industrial Revolution, Living in the Regency, Regency era, travel, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Using Austen as a Historical Resource, a Guest Post from Don Jacobson

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on January 30, 2019. Enjoy!  One of my favorite books is Natalie Zemon Davis’ The Return of Martin Guerre (1983) which heralded the advent of a new historical school: that of subaltern history—essentially the history of sergeants … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Austen Authors, book excerpts, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, history, Industrial Revolution, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, peerage, political stance, reading habits, real life tales, Regency era, research, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

The Beginning of the Turnpike Roads in Georgian England

 The roads leading into London were placed under the control of individual turnpike trusts during the first 30 years of the 1700s in England. My mid century, cross-routes were added to the list under turnpike trusts. The roads, especially those … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, commerce, Georgian England, Industrial Revolution, Living in the UK, Scotland, travel | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Very “Real” Estate: Axminster

Axminster is a market town and civil parish of about 6,000 on the eastern border of Devon. The town is built upon a hill and overlooks the River Axe. The town dates back to around 300 BC. There was once … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, commerce, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Industrial Revolution, real life tales | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

America’s and Great Britain’s Impact on The Industrial Revolution

Who would think that at the beginning of the 18th Century that either America or Great Britain would take the lead in industrializing the world? Yet, during the 1700s and 1800s, it was those two nations which sprang forward to … Continue reading

Posted in America, American History, British history, commerce, Great Britain, Industrial Revolution, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

The Forest of Dean

In west Gloucestershire, marked by the rivers Severn and Wye, we find the Forest of Dean, a large tract of woodland and waste land reserved for royal hunting before 1066. It remains the second largest of the principal Crown forests … Continue reading

Posted in estates, history, Industrial Revolution, kings and queens, legacy, royalty | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ever Been on a “Cook’s Tour”?

Most of you are likely to think a “cook’s tour” has something to do with a chef’s culinary excellence, but the phrase actually has its roots in the world’s oldest and largest travel organization.   Thomas Cook was a 32-year old … Continue reading

Posted in British history, commerce, Great Britain, Industrial Revolution, Living in the UK, real life tales, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Queen Victoria’s Growing Family and the Need for a Better Environment for the Royal Children

Princess Alice Maud Mary, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, arrived at Buckingham Palace 25 April 1843. Reportedly, the queen knew the severity of her labor, but the delivery itself was quite short, only … Continue reading

Posted in British history, family, George IV, Great Britain, Industrial Revolution, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments