Category Archives: Living in the UK

“Rule of Thumb”: The Wife as Property in the Regency Era, Part I

I have written several scenes in my 55+ books in which the wife is abused by her husband, sometimes mentally and sometimes physically. During the Regency there was no laws against such abuse. The wife held no rights. In fact, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, marriage, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Broken Engagements in the Regency Period

 A popular plot in Regency era romances is the broken engagement, but what was the truth of the situation? Unless he suddenly uncovered a flaw in the morals of he lady, once a man proposed to a woman, he was … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, marriage, marriage customs, romance | Tagged , , , , , | 10 Comments

Fencibles: Defending the Homeland + an excerpt from “Mr. Darcy’s Inadvertent Bride”

Fencibles were the British “defense” (from the word ‘defencible’) forces raised for a specific war. They were raised for defense against the treat of invasion during the Seven Years’ War, the American War of Independence, the French Revolutionary Wars, the … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, military, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, war, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Victoria’s Path to the Throne

In our last posting of the Line of Succession, we made note that Princess Alexandrina Victoria made an appearance into the world on 24 May 1819, three days before her cousin, Prince George Frederick Alexander Charles Ernest Augustus (Prince George of Cumberland), giving her … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, Church of England, family, George IV, Georgian, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, marriage, royalty, titles of aristocracy, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Death of Princess Charlotte, Signaling the End of the Hanoverian Line of Succession Was on the Horizon

[Image: Engraving of Princess Caroline from La Belle Assemblée (1806)] Much to the surprise and relief of George III’s England, his son George, Prince of Wales, fulfilled his duty by marrying Princess Caroline of Brunswick on 8 April 1795. Although they were … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, Elizabethan drama, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, marriage customs, real life tales, Regency personalities, royalty, tradtions, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Death of Princess Charlotte, Signaling the End of the Hanoverian Line of Succession Was on the Horizon

To Describe the Aristocracy During the Regency, Would One Use the “Ton,” the “Bon Ton” or Something Else?

Le bon ton is a French phrase meaning “the good style” or “good form.” So one could be part of the ton, if one had the style for it, which is why Beau Brummell could be a leader of fashion … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, political stance, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on To Describe the Aristocracy During the Regency, Would One Use the “Ton,” the “Bon Ton” or Something Else?

Colchester, the Oldest Recorded Town in England

Colchester is an historic Essex town, Britain’s first city and former capital of Roman Britain. Its rich history dates back over 2000 years. In AD49, Colchester was the capital of the kingdom of Cunobelin. It was considered a Roman Colonia, basically, a community dedicated … Continue reading

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Consecration of Westminster Abbey, 28 December 1065

The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster is a large Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, situated to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It was a Benedictine monastic church until the monastery was … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Saxons, architecture, British history, buildings and structures, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, Great Britain, history, legends and myths, Living in the UK, medieval, real life tales, religion, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Consecration of Westminster Abbey, 28 December 1065

The Yorkshire Giant

William Bradley (1787 – 1820) was commonly known as “The Yorkshire Giant” He was born on 10 February 1787 in Market Weighton in Yorkshire’s East Riding. He was the fourth of thirteen children. Weighing in at 14 pounds (6.35 kg) … Continue reading

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Who Is Persuaded in Jane Austen’s “Persuasion”

 Jane Austen writes plot-driven masterpieces, and all her God-given skills come together in Persuasion. In Persuasion we find a twist of pathos, not present in her other novels. We can view Austen’s growth as a writer. She provides her reader … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, excerpt, film adaptations, historical fiction, Jane Austen, language choices, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Persuasion, Regency era, Regency romance, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments