Category Archives: Living in the UK

Christmas Pudding, Mincemeat Pies, and Christmas Tales + a Giveaway

I have debated over the last couple of weeks the nature of this post. Christmas? Something else? A mix? I finally decided we have had enough Christmas (at least, I have, for my decorations are up, presents wrapped, and the … Continue reading

Posted in book release, books, British history, Christmas, England, Georgian England, giveaway, holidays, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, publishing, reading habits, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, tradtions, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Did Queen Victoria Marry John Brown?

  Have you seen the film Victoria and Abdul? It started me thinking more on the “supposed” relationship between Queen Victoria and her Scottish servant John Brown. (By the way, this relationship has also been explored in film. Again the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, castles, film, film adaptations, Great Britain, history, Living in the UK, research, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

History of The Odiham Agricultural Society and the Release of “Mr. Darcy’s Bet”

Britain’s first veterinary college has its roots in Hampshire’s Odiham Agricultural Society, formed on 16 May 1783 for the purpose of encouraging local development of industry and agriculture. Livestock breeding and management was very important to this group. The activities … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Jane Austen, Living in the UK, medieval, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, real life tales, science, Vagary, Wales, world history, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Statute of Wills, Henry VIII’s Answer to Primogeniture

The Statute of Wills (32 Hen. 8, c. 1 – enacted in 1540) was an English Act of Parliament, which created a mechanism for landowners to name who would inherit their landed property. A written will was required. It permitted a … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, Anglo-Normans, castles, Living in the UK, primogenture | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Was the “Ton” or the “Bon Ton” a More Appropriate Descriptor to Call the Aristocracy During the Regency Era?

Le bon ton is a French phrase meaning “the good style” or “good form.” So one could be part of the ton, if one had the style for it, which is why Beau Brummell could be a leader of fashion … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, political stance, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , ,

A Debt-Ridden Inheritance During the Regency Era

In many Regency novels, either the hero inherits an estate/title that is deep in debt, not of his making, or the heroine’s father has died and left his family destitute, due to his gaming debts or his poor investments. Both … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Inheritance, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, primogenture, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

Exercise Tiger, a Tragic Rehearsal for D-Day

Most of us know something of D-Day. On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British history, Great Britain, history, Living in the UK, military, war | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments