Category Archives: medicine

The Medical Professions in the Georgian Era

Apothecaries did not hold the same status in the Georgian era as one might think. We must recall the gentleman’s social class determined his “occupation” during the last 1700s and early 1800s. The Victoria and Albert Museum website tells us … Continue reading

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Were Ambulances Available in the Regency Era?

I had a question from one of my readers recently. She had read a book set in the Regency era, and, in it, an ambulance was called for to fetch a patient to a hospital. Naturally, she wanted to know … Continue reading

Posted in British history, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Living in the Regency, medicine, Napoleonic Wars, real life tales, Regency era, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Treatment of Typhus Upon the Russian Front During the Napoleonic Campaign

In the year 1817, a Prussian army physician by the name of Krantz published a medical history of the treatment of typhus during the Napoleonic campaign in Russia. It was entitled: Bemerkungen ueber den Gang der Krankheiten welche in der … Continue reading

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Bleeding a Patient to Cure Apoplexy During the Regency Era

In Regency novels, the reader frequently reads of one of the characters suffering an apoplexy. Exactly, what does that mean? Apoplexy (from the Ancient Greek, meaning “a striking away”) is bleeding within internal organs and the accompanying symptoms. For example, ovarian apoplexy is … Continue reading

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On Being a Midwife, a Guest Post from Carole Penfield

During the Georgian and Regency eras, and even earlier, most women who were “breeding” worried a great deal, as these were the most dangerous years of their life. Two of Jane Austen’s brothers lost their wives in childbirth, so she … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, British history, eBooks, excerpt, family, film, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Guest Post, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, medicine, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, research, Sense & Sensibility, trilogy, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on On Being a Midwife, a Guest Post from Carole Penfield

Mystery and Suspense Month: The Earl Claims His Comfort: Book 2 of The Twins’ Trilogy

Last Wednesday, I shared an excerpt from Book 1 of the Twins’ Trilogy, Angel Comes to the Devil’s Keep. Today I have an excerpt from The Earl Claims His Comfort, which is Book 2 of the Twins’ Trilogy. In the … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, books, British history, castles, estates, family, Georgian Era, Great Britain, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, marriage customs, medicine, mystery, primogenture, Regency era, Regency romance, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Edward Jenner, Father of “Vaccination”

With all the debate still going on about whether to vaccinate or not for COVID-19 and all the variants in the news, I thought we might have look at the first vaccines. Born in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, in May 1749, the … Continue reading

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“Unusual” Medical Cures Found in History

I thought to look at what was acceptable medical practice during the Regency era and all through the past. We know, for example, that the lack of what we would now call “proper” medical procedures caused Princess Charlotte to lose … Continue reading

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Picking One’s Teeth, or Getting the Research Correct + the Release of “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

If one has never written an historical book, be it fiction or nonfiction, he/she likely does not quite grasp the idea that having accuracy, even in the smallest of details, is essential. In my latest release, Captain Stanwick’s Bride: A … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, book release, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, medicine, military, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, Uncategorized, war, War of 1812, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

“Murder of a Bastard Child,” an Historical Crime Against Children

In the 18th Century in England, what was the fate of a child born to a young woman pregnant out of wedlock? Alan Taylor in the British History Georgian Lives Facebook Group tells us, “The most common capital offence for … Continue reading

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