Category Archives: medicine

Bleeding a Patient to Cure Apoplexy During the Regency Era

In Regency novels, the reader frequently reads of one of the characters suffering an apoplexy. Exactly, what does that mean? Apoplexy (from the Ancient Greek, meaning “a striking away”) is bleeding within internal organs and the accompanying symptoms. For example, ovarian apoplexy is … Continue reading

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On Being a Midwife, a Guest Post from Carole Penfield

During the Georgian and Regency eras, and even earlier, most women who were “breeding” worried a great deal, as these were the most dangerous years of their life. Two of Jane Austen’s brothers lost their wives in childbirth, so she … Continue reading

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Mystery and Suspense Month: The Earl Claims His Comfort: Book 2 of The Twins’ Trilogy

Last Wednesday, I shared an excerpt from Book 1 of the Twins’ Trilogy, Angel Comes to the Devil’s Keep. Today I have an excerpt from The Earl Claims His Comfort, which is Book 2 of the Twins’ Trilogy. In the … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, books, British history, castles, estates, family, Georgian Era, Great Britain, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, marriage customs, medicine, mystery, primogenture, Regency era, Regency romance, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Edward Jenner, Father of “Vaccination”

With all the debate still going on about whether to vaccinate or not for COVID-19 and all the variants in the news, I thought we might have look at the first vaccines. Born in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, in May 1749, the … Continue reading

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“Unusual” Medical Cures Found in History

I thought to look at what was acceptable medical practice during the Regency era and all through the past. We know, for example, that the lack of what we would now call “proper” medical procedures caused Princess Charlotte to lose … Continue reading

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Picking One’s Teeth, or Getting the Research Correct + the Release of “Captain Stanwick’s Bride”

If one has never written an historical book, be it fiction or nonfiction, he/she likely does not quite grasp the idea that having accuracy, even in the smallest of details, is essential. In my latest release, Captain Stanwick’s Bride: A … Continue reading

Posted in American History, book excerpts, book release, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, medicine, military, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, Uncategorized, war, War of 1812, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

“Murder of a Bastard Child,” an Historical Crime Against Children

In the 18th Century in England, what was the fate of a child born to a young woman pregnant out of wedlock? Alan Taylor in the British History Georgian Lives Facebook Group tells us, “The most common capital offence for … Continue reading

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The “Churching” of Women After Childbirth

 Although it has largely fallen out of favor with Western religion, the concept of “churching” in the Church of England can be traced well into the 20th Century. (Margaret Houlbrooke. Rite out of Time: a Study of the Ancient Rite of … Continue reading

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Body Snatchers, Part II – the Release of “The Mysterious Death of Mr. Darcy”

On Friday, we looked at Resurrectionists. Today, we will make a slight distinction with Body Snatchers.  Like what resurrectionists did, body snatching is the secret removal of a corpse from its burial site. As was explained in Friday’s piece the … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, medicine, mystery, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, suspense, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Body Snatchers, Part II – the Release of “The Mysterious Death of Mr. Darcy”

Mudeford, an English Spa Favored by King George III + an Excerpt from “The Mysterious Death of Mr. Darcy”

With the onset of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, the idea of a European Grand Tour for English aristocratic class lost its appeal. Instead, English men and women turned their sights on popular British destinations, such as Brighton, … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, books, British history, buildings and structures, Dorset, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, kings and queens, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, medicine, mystery, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, romance, royalty, spooky tales, suspense | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment