Category Archives: medicine

Body Snatchers, Part II – the Release of “The Mysterious Death of Mr. Darcy”

On Friday, we looked at Resurrectionists. Today, we will make a slight distinction with Body Snatchers.  Like what resurrectionists did, body snatching is the secret removal of a corpse from its burial site. As was explained in Friday’s piece the … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, medicine, mystery, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, suspense, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mudeford, an English Spa Favored by King George III + an Excerpt from “The Mysterious Death of Mr. Darcy”

With the onset of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, the idea of a European Grand Tour for English aristocratic class lost its appeal. Instead, English men and women turned their sights on popular British destinations, such as Brighton, … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, books, British history, buildings and structures, Dorset, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, kings and queens, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, medicine, mystery, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, romance, royalty, spooky tales, suspense | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“Luminous” Blog Tour ~ Worker Compensation Laws and the Radium Girls, a Guest Post from Samantha Wilcoxson

Many people do not realize how much we owe to the dial painters in 1920’s radium studios for our modern workers’ compensation laws. The idea that workers should be protected from harm and that companies were liable for damages to … Continue reading

Posted in American History, blog hop, book release, British history, eBooks, Guest Post, history, Industrial Revolution, medicine, publishing, reading habits, real life tales, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The “Churching” of Women After Childbirth

 Although it has largely fallen out of favor with Western religion, the concept of “churching” in the Church of England can be traced well into the 20th Century. (Margaret Houlbrooke. Rite out of Time: a Study of the Ancient Rite of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, England, Great Britain, history, Living in the UK, marriage, marriage customs, medicine, religion, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , ,

Jane Austen, Contagions, & the Danger of Doubling, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on 19 March 2020. I thought it appropriate to repeat here.  It has been so long since a disastrous contagion swept through the Western world that most of us have forgotten … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Austen Authors, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, medicine | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“A Touch of Honor” [or] What to Do With a Character You Despise?

Early on, I convinced my traditional publisher, Ulysses Press, to print one of my Regency romances – a book I originally called A Touch of Gold and later called A Touch of Scandal. Ulysses released the book under the title … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, Church of England, estates, fashion, Georgian England, historical fiction, Inheritance, Ireland, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, medicine, Realm series, Regency era, Ulysses Press | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Treatment of Typhus Upon the Russian Front During the Napoleonic Campaign

In the year 1817, a Prussian army physician by the name of Krantz published a medical history of the treatment of typhus during the Napoleonic campaign in Russia. It was entitled: Bemerkungen ueber den Gang der Krankheiten welche in der … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, medicine, military, Napoleonic Wars, real life tales, Realm series, Regency era, research, science | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Did Lady Bertram Suffer from a Thyroid Condition? a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on July 23, 2019. Enjoy! Mansfield Park’s Lady Bertram is the epitome of laziness and indolence. Her favourite activity is sitting on her favourite sofa, with a piece of sewing on her lap … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, medicine, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, Regency romance, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

How Did Smith Brothers Cough Drops Get Its Name?

William (Trade) and Andrew (Mark) were the sons of James Smith, who moved his family from St. Armand, Quebec, to Poughkeepsie, New York in 1847. A carpenter by trade, Smith meant to open a restaurant, Smith’s Dining Saloon, in his … Continue reading

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In History, “False Teeth” Were Not So False

  What we refer to as “false” teeth are not false, for most dentures in history contained real teeth, either from an other human or from an animal. Some of the oldest finding regarding false teeth come to us from Mexico. … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British history, Elizabeth I, fashion, history, inventions, medicine | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments