Category Archives: religion

“Bell, Book, and Candle” and Excommunication During the Georgian Era

In the Roman Catholic church, “bell, book, and candle” came to be synonymous with “major excommunication,” or “anathema.” The phrase dates back to the 9th Century and has symbolic meaning. The “bell” came to mean the public character of the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Regency era, religion, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

18 July 1817: The Death of Jane Austen, a Guest Post by Kyra Kramer

This is a repeat of a post from 2017 from Kyra Kramer. It speaks so poignantly of the loss of Jane Austen that I thought it appropriate to share here with you on the 202nd Anniversary of Jane Austen’s passing.  … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, buildings and structures, Georgian England, Guest Post, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, Regency era, Regency personalities, religion | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

What Exactly Did It Mean for A Clergyman to Have a “Living” Bestowed Upon Him During the Regency Period?

We often read in a Regency era book something to the effect of the master of the estate bestowing a “living” upon a clergyman. Exactly, what did that entail? Once the living was bestowed, could the owner of the estate … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, “the Last Great Englishman”

 Sunday, June 18, will be the 202nd Anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, marking the final defeat of the French military leader and emperor Napoleon Bonaparte. On the English side stood Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, an Anglo-Irish soldier … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Living in the Regency, Napoleonic Wars, political stance, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, religion, titles of aristocracy, war, world history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Jonathan Martin, Arsonist ~ Full of Fury and Fire

Many of my Regency stories is set in Yorkshire, one of my favorite places in the UK. Today, I bring you a tale that occurred on 1 February 1829, in the town of York and, specifically, involved the Cathedral and … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, real life tales, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Irish Agrarian Societies: Whiteboys and Levellers, Part of the Plot of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy”

The Whiteboys and Levellers were mid 18th C and early 19th C secret agrarian societies located in Ireland, more specifically in the southwestern part of Ireland. The Whiteboys got their start in 1762 in County Waterford, when 18 men met … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, Church of England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Ireland, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, religion, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Annuities in the Regency as Basis for “Mr. Darcy’s Bargain”

Much of the action of my Mr. Darcy’s Bargain, is based around a scam perpetrated by Mr. Wickham upon the citizens of Meryton, as well as Mr. Darcy’s attempts to thwart him. Wickham convinces many in Hertfordshire to invest in an … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, British currency, British history, British Navy, commerce, eBooks, George Wickham, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, Regency era, Regency romance, religion, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments