Category Archives: religion

All Hallow’s Eve During the Regency

For this piece, I pulled together bits of information on All Hallow’s Eve from a variety of sources, all of which are cited within the post. I hope you enjoy learning of some of Halloween’s traditions. Tomorrow evening, barring the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, history, holidays, Ireland, Jane Austen, legends, legends and myths, medieval, Northanger Abbey, real life tales, religion, Scotland, Wales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Revenants, Coming Back from the Dead

Soon, I will stand in my driveway and hand out candy snacks to those brave enough to enter my small cul de sac, where few turn on their lights for the Trick or Treaters. And once more, my thoughts again … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, customs and tradiitons, eBooks, George Wickham, gothic and paranormal, historical fiction, Jane Austen, legends and myths, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, religion, suspense, vampires | Tagged , , , , , ,

Realities of Marriage in the Regency Era + the Release of “The Heartless Earl” + a Giveaway

In chapter six of volume one of Pride and Prejudice, Charlotte Lucas and Elizabeth Bennet provide us several tidbits regarding the success of a marriage during the Georgian era.  ~  “If a woman conceals her affection with the same skill … Continue reading

Posted in America, American History, Austen Authors, blog hop, book excerpts, book release, British history, eBooks, excerpt, family, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, heroines, historical fiction, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, Pride and Prejudice, reading habits, Regency era, religion, tradtions, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

“Bell, Book, and Candle” and Excommunication During the Georgian Era

In the Roman Catholic church, “bell, book, and candle” came to be synonymous with “major excommunication,” or “anathema.” The phrase dates back to the 9th Century and has symbolic meaning. The “bell” came to mean the public character of the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Regency era, religion, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

18 July 1817: The Death of Jane Austen, a Guest Post by Kyra Kramer

This is a repeat of a post from 2017 from Kyra Kramer. It speaks so poignantly of the loss of Jane Austen that I thought it appropriate to share here with you on the 202nd Anniversary of Jane Austen’s passing.  … Continue reading

Posted in book release, British history, buildings and structures, Georgian England, Guest Post, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, Regency era, Regency personalities, religion | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

What Exactly Did It Mean for A Clergyman to Have a “Living” Bestowed Upon Him During the Regency Period?

We often read in a Regency era book something to the effect of the master of the estate bestowing a “living” upon a clergyman. Exactly, what did that entail? Once the living was bestowed, could the owner of the estate … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, religion, research | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, “the Last Great Englishman”

 Sunday, June 18, will be the 202nd Anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, marking the final defeat of the French military leader and emperor Napoleon Bonaparte. On the English side stood Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, an Anglo-Irish soldier … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Living in the Regency, Napoleonic Wars, political stance, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, religion, titles of aristocracy, war, world history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments