Tag Archives: Emma

The Strict Social Structure of Jane Austen’s Novels

Overall, the early 19th Century novels were those that expressed society in realistic terms. Austen’s novels, as well as others of her time, immerse the reader in the various levels of society, the social strata, so to speak. Austen does … Continue reading

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The Obsession with Money and Society in Austen’s Novels

 Austen’s novels speak loudly with society’s obsession with money and connections. Money and status was obtained through marriage. What we soon come to accept as a reader of Jane Austen’s novels is that her heroines marry for love (and a … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, estates, family, Georgian Era, historical fiction, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, Pride and Prejudice, reading, reading habits, Regency personalities, Regency romance, romance | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Lessons on Life, Courtesy of Jane Austen

Recently, I looked at the parts of Pride and Prejudice, which spoke to me early on in my life-long love of Jane Austen’s works. Then I began to think of the other Austen phrases, which have been a part of … Continue reading

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The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Novels

In James Fordyce’s Sermons to Young Women (1766), Fordyce says, “The world, I know not how, overlooks in our sex a thousand irregularities, which it never forgives in yours; so that the honour and peace of a family are, in … Continue reading

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Genderlessness in Jane Austen’s “Emma,” a Guest Post from Lelia Eye

This post originally appeared on the Austen Authors’ blog on February 11, 2021. There is lots within the post to ponder. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. I have been facing rather bad morning sickness which … Continue reading

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The Significance of Birth Order in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, “the seventh of eight children of a clergyman in a country village in Hampshire, England. Jane was very close to her older sister, Cassandra, who remained her faithful editor and critic throughout … Continue reading

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Windows in Jane Austen’s Stories, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

We, Janeites, know that windows are a thing in Jane Austen’s novels. One of Mr Collins’ most memorable scenes in Pride and Prejudice takes place when he and his wife are on the way to visit the formidable Lady Catherine de Bourgh alongside their visitor, Miss Elizabeth … Continue reading

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The Real Life Influences Upon Jane Austen’s Novels

As authors of historical fiction, we take great pleasure in a research “tidbit,” which introduces our fictional characters to historical figures. I, for example, have introduced John Loudon McAdam, the father of the modern road, to the readers of A Touch of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Pride and Prejudice, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Real Life Influences Upon Jane Austen’s Novels

Austen-Homage Literature and the Mystery Genre

Although publishers long ago labeled Jane Austen-inspired pieces as “niche” literature, they erred. Austen’s touch can be found in a variety of pieces: women’s literature, romance, variations, historical fiction, paranormal, fantasy, and mystery. Over the years, I have written several … Continue reading

Posted in books, Jane Austen, literature, mystery, Regency era, Regency romance, romance, suspense | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

How Was It to Shop in Market Towns and Villages of Early 1800s England?

Obviously, there would not be street vendors, but rather peddlers, who would travel from village to village, selling their ware. “A peddler, in British English pedlar, also known as a canvasser, cheapjack, monger, higler or solicitor (with negative connotations since the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, Uncategorized, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments