Category Archives: British history

Celebrating the Release of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy” with an Excerpt + a Giveaway

Today, I celebrate the release of Lady Chandler’s Sister, the third book in the Twins’ trilogy, a romantic suspense set in 1820 England, five years after the end of the Napoleonic War and the first year on the throne for … Continue reading

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Irish Agrarian Societies: the Rockite Movement and the Release of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy”

The third book in my Twins’ Trilogy, Lady Chandler’s Sister, leads us along a dark path in British history. The book culminates in early January 1822, which was when the Rockite movement had set its sights on having its demands … Continue reading

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Irish Agrarian Societies: The Ribbonmen, Part of the Plot of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy”

Whiteboyism, the subject of Monday’s post, essentially ceased to operate toward the end of the eighteenth century, although it never truly disappeared, for it resurrected its head in the Munster region (Counties Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary, and Waterford) in … Continue reading

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Irish Agrarian Societies: Whiteboys and Levellers, Part of the Plot of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy”

The Whiteboys and Levellers were mid 18th C and early 19th C secret agrarian societies located in Ireland, more specifically in the southwestern part of Ireland. The Whiteboys got their start in 1762 in County Waterford, when 18 men met … Continue reading

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Plot Point: Agrarian Societies in Ireland, and the Release of “Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 of the Twins’ Trilogy”

Who was Captain Rock? First, let’s begin with a quick overview, simply to set some parameters. “Captain Rock was a mythical Irish folk hero, and the name used for the agrarian rebel group he represented in the south-west of Ireland from 1821 … Continue reading

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The “Comedy” Found in Jane Austen’s Novels

According to Literary Devices, “Comedy is a literary genre and a type of dramatic work that is amusing and satirical in its tone, mostly having a cheerful ending. The motif   of this dramatic work is triumph over unpleasant circumstance by creating comic … Continue reading

Posted in books, British history, Georgian England, historical fiction, Inheritance, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage customs, Persuasion, political stance, primogenture, publishing, reading habits, Regency era, Regency personalities, Regency romance, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1794: Ratcliffe on Fire and an Act of “Charity”

In 1794, a fire in East London’s Ratcliffe district of London proved to be the largest to occur between the Great Fire of 1666 and the Blitz of 1940. The Ratcliffe Highway Murders served as a model for my highly acclaimed … Continue reading

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