Tag Archives: vocabulary

Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

Inexpressibles ~ Etymology Compare to unmentionables ‎(“underwear”). Geri Walton at her Unique Histories from the 18th and 19th Centuries tells us “That part of the dress which it is now unlawful to name, seems of old to have had the … Continue reading

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Are You Familiar With These Words and Phrases?

Spillikin ~ The Oxford Living Dictionaries gives us: [treated as singular] A game played with a heap of small rods of wood, bone, or plastic, in which players try to remove one at a time without disturbing the others, while Wikitionary … Continue reading

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Regency Lexicon – The Letters “X,” “Y,” and “Z”

Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Coming to the End – X, Y, and Z xebec – a small three-masted Mediterranean vessel with both square and lateen sails, originally used by Algerian pirates and later used for commerce yager – a … Continue reading

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Regency Lexicon – The Letter “W”

Regency Era Lexicon – Nearing the End: We’re at “W” wafer – made of flour and gum; one dampened the wafer and then placed it on a letter to seal it waggonette – a four-wheel lightweight carriage; used for pleasure … Continue reading

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Regency Lexicon – We Are Up to “U” and “V”

Regency Era Lexicon – Now For “U” and “V” union – short for a workhouse; usually built by a union of several individual parishes up – used in referring to moving toward London; used in referring to coaches (and later … Continue reading

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Regency Era Lexicon – Crossing Our “T’s”

Regency Era Lexicon – And Then There Was “T” take orders – becoming a clergyman in the Church of England take silks – a barrister would wear a silk gown once he became the King’s Counsel (or the Queen’s Counsel) … Continue reading

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Regency Era Lexicon – Continuing on to the Letter “S”

Regency Era Lexicon – Continues with the Letter “S” s. – the abbreviation for shilling (a shilling is a English silver coin worth twelvepence; 20 shillings = one pound) Sabbatarians – VERY strict observers of the Sabbath sack – a … Continue reading

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