Tag Archives: research

What Does a Renown French Astronomer Have to Do with the Release of “Mr. Darcy’s Bet?” + a Giveaway

Charles Messier was born in Badonviller on 26 June 1730 in the Lorraine region of France. He was the tenth of twelve children. Six of his siblings died young. Messier’s interest in astronomy was fired by, first, the Great Comet … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, book release, excerpt, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Napoleonic Wars, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, research, Uncategorized, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Using Austen as a Historical Resource, a Guest Post from Don Jacobson

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on January 30, 2019. Enjoy!  One of my favorite books is Natalie Zemon Davis’ The Return of Martin Guerre (1983) which heralded the advent of a new historical school: that of subaltern history—essentially the history of sergeants … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Austen Authors, book excerpts, British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, history, Industrial Revolution, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, peerage, political stance, reading habits, real life tales, Regency era, research, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

How Do We Know Jane Austen’s “Stuff” Actually Belongs to Her? a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on March 21, 2019. Enjoy! A few weeks ago, Alexa Adams, one of our Austen Authors, wrote an interesting blog on the Rice portrait, which is believed by some to be a painting of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, research | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

The Rice Portrait of Jane Austen? a Guest Post from Alexa Adams

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on January 25, 2019. Enjoy!  How clearly I recall writing this blog post in March of 2011. I was six months pregnant with my daughter and spent the bulk of the morning at a lab … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, Regency personalities, research | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Clandestine Weddings and the Release of “Lady Chandler’s Sister” + a Giveaway

Clandestine/Irregular Weddings in Scotland  A clandestine wedding plays a key role in solving the mystery that occurs in my latest Regency romantic suspense, Lady Chandler’s Sister: Book 3 the Twins’ Trilogy. But exactly what constituted a clandestine or irregular marriage during … Continue reading

Posted in Black Opal Books, book release, British history, eBooks, George IV, Georgian England, Georgian Era, giveaway, historical fiction, Ireland, marriage, marriage customs, publishing, real life tales, Regency romance, research, romance, Scotland, suspense, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Tenant of the Curtesy and the Release of “Where There’s a FitzWILLiam Darcy, There’s a Way” + a Giveaway

Tenant of the Curtesy or Courtesy tenure is a legal term indicating the life interest which a widower (meaning the wife’s former husband) may claim in the lands of the deceased wife, under certain conditions. Those requisites to create a … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, British history, George Wickham, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Austen Sideroads Yield Interesting Journeys, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway

Combing the internet for information on the life and times of Jane Austen sometimes leads to links in which the English author is mentioned in passing or as part of a broader story. More times than not, these side trips … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, buildings and structures, Guest Blog, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, research | Tagged , , , , ,