Category Archives: customs and tradiitons

Revenants, Coming Back from the Dead

Soon, I will stand in my driveway and hand out candy snacks to those brave enough to enter my small cul de sac, where few turn on their lights for the Trick or Treaters. And once more, my thoughts again … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, customs and tradiitons, eBooks, George Wickham, gothic and paranormal, historical fiction, Jane Austen, legends and myths, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, religion, suspense, vampires | Tagged , , , , , ,

Jane Austen and the Lottery Craze, a Guest Post from Nancy Lawrence

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on 20 July 2019. Enjoy!  In her unfinished novel Sanditon, Jane Austen introduced the character of Mr. Parker by describing his love for the sea-side town of Sanditon in this manner: Sanditon was … Continue reading

Posted in British history, commerce, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era, research, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Playing Cards in Jane Austen’s England, Pleasant Pastime, as Well as Gambling

… the undeniably romantic allure of the richly decorated gaming clubs or the reckless gambling of dynastic fortunes [which] rather trump[s] the dingy and dull penny games played against street walls or in alehouses. (Arthur Pitt, MA dissertation, A Study Of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, quotes, Regency era, Regency romance, research, Sense & Sensibility, Whigs | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Significance of Birth Order in Jane Austen’s Novels, a Guest Post from Eliza Shearer

This post originally appeared on Austen Authors on June 25, 2019. Enjoy!  Birth order has an impact on your personality and behaviour, according to many psychologists. Some of the stereotypes related to sibling birth order have primarily been confirmed by … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, customs and tradiitons, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Post, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, reading, real life tales, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Was the “Ton” or the “Bon Ton” a More Appropriate Descriptor to Call the Aristocracy During the Regency Era?

Le bon ton is a French phrase meaning “the good style” or “good form.” So one could be part of the ton, if one had the style for it, which is why Beau Brummell could be a leader of fashion … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, political stance, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency personalities, titles of aristocracy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , ,

A Debt-Ridden Inheritance During the Regency Era

In many Regency novels, either the hero inherits an estate/title that is deep in debt, not of his making, or the heroine’s father has died and left his family destitute, due to his gaming debts or his poor investments. Both … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Inheritance, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, primogenture, real life tales, Regency era, Regency romance, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

The “Skinny” on Abdicating a Title During the Regency Era

Many times in Regency-based novels we have the situation where for one reason or another, the hero refused the title he has inherited and “abdicates” his new peerage. The question is whether this is a viable plot line.  The answer … Continue reading

Posted in Black Opal Books, British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, estates, family, Georgian England, Georgian Era, history, Inheritance, kings and queens, legacy, peerage, real life tales, Regency era, research, titles of aristocracy, tradtions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments