Category Archives: George Wickham

The Great Valley Road, Setting for My Novel, “The Road to Understanding”

When I began writing The Road to Understanding, I needed a perfect route to take my characters across the mountains between Virginia and Tennessee in the late 1780s. Who Traveled Across The Great Valley Road? The majority of the settlers in … Continue reading

Posted in America, book excerpts, book release, books, customs and tradiitons, eBooks, George Wickham, historical fiction, Pride and Prejudice, romance, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Source of Elizabeth Bennet’s Myopic View of Mr. Darcy

 Fitzwilliam Darcy is a major, but minor, character in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Although he plays a major role in the story’s outcome, after all, Mr. Darcy is the romantic hero of the piece, he is not in every … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, family, George Wickham, Georgian Era, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency romance | Tagged , , , , , | 16 Comments

In Quest of the Officers, a Guest Post from Diana J. Oaks

Below you will find another of the fabulous posts one might find on any given day on Austen Authors. Diana J. Oaks explores the “appeal” of a man or woman in uniform.  Lydia Bennet. She’s naughty, she’s loud, she’s determined … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, British Navy, George Wickham, Guest Post, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, manuscript evaluation, military, Pride and Prejudice | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Being a “Gentleman” in Regency England

 In 1583 Sir Thomas Smith wrote: “One who can live idly and without manual labour and will bear the port (deportment) and countenance of a gentleman, he shall be taken for a gentleman.” But what does “being a gentleman” entail? … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, George Wickham, Georgian England, Great Britain, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, primogenture, Regency era | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

The Significance of Books and of Reading in Jane Austen’s Novels, Guest Post from Lauren Gilbert

  The Significance of Books and Reading in Jane Austen’s Novels By Lauren Gilbert  Jane Austen was a reader.  She read widely.  We know she enjoyed novels; she was a subscriber to Fanny Burney’s third novel, Cecilia or Memoirs of … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, books, British history, family, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Blog, Guest Post, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, reading | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Regency Era Con Man, Gregor McGregor and the Release of “Mr. Darcy’s Bargain”

 In writing my latest Austen-inspired vagary, Mr. Darcy’s Bargain, I researched LOTS of scams of the Regency era. One of the most prolific of those who practiced a scheme to defraud others was a Scot named Gregor McGregor. Gregor McGregor … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Austen Authors, blog hop, book excerpts, book release, books, British history, British Navy, eBooks, excerpt, George Wickham, Georgian England, giveaway, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, Regency personalities, Regency romance, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Annuities in the Regency as Basis for “Mr. Darcy’s Bargain”

Much of the action of latest release,  Mr. Darcy’s Bargain, is based around a scam perpetrated by Mr. Wickham upon the citizens of Meryton, as well as Mr. Darcy’s attempts to thwart him. Wickham convinces many in Hertfordshire to invest … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, British currency, British history, British Navy, commerce, eBooks, George Wickham, historical fiction, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, Regency era, Regency romance, religion, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments