Tag Archives: war

Colonel Matthew Locke, an Advocate for Universal Manhood Suffrage

On Friday, May 18, I presented with the celebration of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. On Monday, May 21, I included an article on Captain James Jack, who was not as famous as Paul Revere, but just as heroic. Today, … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British currency, Declaration of Independence, England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, political stance, real life tales, research, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Do You Know More Than One City Served as the U. S. Capital?

I recently did one of those mind-dulling quizzes on Facebook. It’s the one where they say they can tell a person’s education based on questions on U. S. history. To demonstrate how reliable the quiz is, I missed one and … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Uncategorized, war | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Black Monday Tragedy

 Black Monday was the Monday after Easter on 13 April 1360, during the Hundred Years’ War (1337 – 1360). The Hundred Years’ War began in 1337; by 1359, King Edward III of England was actively attempting to conquer France. In October, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Edward III, kings and queens, military | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

A Labor Day Break from Blogging…

LABOR DAY: WHAT IT MEANS According the U.S., Department of Labor, “Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Have You Heard of “Forlorn Hope”?

From 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, we find “forlorn hope” as defined as, “FORLORN HOPE (through Dutch verloren hoop, from Ger. verlorene Haufe=”lost troop”; Haufe, “heap,” being equivalent in the 17th century to “body of troops”; the French equivalent is enfants perdu), … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British history | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

The Christmas Eve Truce of 1914

The Christmas truce (German: Weihnachtsfrieden; French: Trêve de Noël) was a series of widespread but unofficial ceasefires along the Western Front around Christmas 1914. In the week leading up to the holiday, German and British soldiers crossed trenches to exchange … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Great Britain, war | Tagged , , , ,

The Open Christmas Letter 1914

In the lead up to Christmas 1914, there were several peace initiatives. The Open Christmas Letter was a public message for peace addressed “To the Women of Germany and Austria,” signed by a group of 101 British women suffragettes at … Continue reading

Posted in British history, customs and tradiitons, Great Britain | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments