Category Archives: medieval

The Theatre-Loving Fore-Runners of Shakespeare ~ Part I

 With the rediscovery of the works of Seneca, Plautus, and Terence, the renaissance of 16th Century England began. First edited in 1308 by an Nicholas Treveth, the tragedian Seneca remained unnoticed for some time by those in England, for Treveth … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, British history, drama, England, kings and queens, medieval, playwrights, theatre | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Mappa Mundi, the World’s Largest Medieval Map

Housed in the Hereford Cathedreal, the Mappa Mundi is believed to the be the world’s largest medieval map. England specialized in world maps of the Middle Ages. They were drawn upon cloth or walls or animal skins.  Only those who … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Age of Chaucer, British history, buildings and structures, Church of England, medieval, real life tales | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Oxfordshire St. George Play

Closely related to the Morris and Sword Dancers, the Oxfordshire St. George Play is considered a kind of Mummers Play. As well as possessing close elements of kinship, the characters in all these plays are largely interchangeable. That being said, … Continue reading

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The Second Shepherds’ Play, England’s “First Comedy”

  The Wakefield mystery play cycle included The Second Shepherd’s Play. The author is unknown, but the play is commonly attributed to the Wakefield Master. This play dates from the latter half of the 15th Century. It is written in Middle … Continue reading

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17th Century Witch Hunter, Matthew Hopkins

 Matthew Hopkins was born in Wenham Magna, Suffolk, England. He was a Folk Figure, becoming England’s notorious “Witchfinder General,” active during the English Civil War. He was said to have exploited the fear and unrest of the times for his … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, gothic and paranormal, legends, medieval, mystery | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The Quem Quaeritis Trope, the Roots of Liturgical Drama

 The first Easter or Quem Quaeritis trope had its beginnings in the Benedictine Abbey of St. Gall, Switzerland. (The script of this first trope and an accompanying translation can be found below.) The Easter trope became the model for similar … Continue reading

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Celebrating the Release of “A Dance with Mr. Darcy: A Pride and Prejudice Vagary” + Giveaway

A major turning point in my latest Austen-inspired vagary, A Dance with Mr. Darcy, comes when Elizabeth permits Lydia to convince her to join in the St  Agnes Eve festivities.  But who was St Agnes? And why do we celebrate … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, book excerpts, book release, customs and tradiitons, eBooks, excerpt, giveaway, historical fiction, history, Jane Austen, marriage customs, medieval, Regency romance, religion, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , | 22 Comments