Tag Archives: drama

New Year’s Resolutions for Some Favorite Classic Characters

New Year’s was not always celebrated on 1 January. Ancient cultures celebrated the New Year in mid-March with the planting of a new crop. It is said that the Babylonians were the first to make New Year’s resolutions. That would … Continue reading

Posted in books, drama, Elizabethan drama, Jane Austen, King Arthur, legends and myths, literature, playwrights, Pride and Prejudice, reading, reading habits | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Pre-Elizabethan Drama: Morality Plays

Previously, I did a piece on Liturgical Drama. Today I would like to look at Moralities. As compared to the Miracle or Liturgical dramas, the morality play was one where the playwright had to come up with an original story … Continue reading

Posted in acting, Age of Chaucer, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, drama, medieval, playwrights, Vagary | Tagged , , , , ,

Anna Larpent, 18th Century Diarist and Lover of Plays

An 18th Century diarist, Anna Larpent’s diary gives a look into Georgian life. She was the daughter of a diplomat. She served as the de facto assistant Examiner of Plays during her time. At age 18, Larpent pulished a 32-page … Continue reading

Posted in British history, drama, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Jane Austen, playwrights, reading habits, real life tales, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

How Is Pride & Prejudice & a Shakespearean Scholar Connected to Gorhambury House?

Several months back, I landed upon an idea that has become part of my latest Austen-inspired book. You see, there is this whole faction of people/experts who believe that Francis Bacon and others within Bacon’s circle wrote Shakespeare’s plays. And … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, blog hop, book excerpts, book release, British history, drama, excerpt, Georgian England, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, playwrights, Pride and Prejudice, publishing, reading habits, Vagary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

The Theatre-Loving Fore-Runners of Shakespeare ~ Part I

 With the rediscovery of the works of Seneca, Plautus, and Terence, the renaissance of 16th Century England began. First edited in 1308 by an Nicholas Treveth, the tragedian Seneca remained unnoticed for some time by those in England, for Treveth … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, British history, drama, England, kings and queens, medieval, playwrights, theatre | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Shetland Sword Dance

 Sir Walter Scott wrote in his diary of the Shetland Sword Dance on 7 August 1814. “At Scalloway my curiosity was gratified by an account of the sword-dance, now almost lost, but still practiced in the Island of Papa…. There … Continue reading

Posted in Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, British history, drama, literature, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

John Heywood, England’s First Great Dramatist

We know little of John Heywood’s life, other than the year of his birth, which was 1497. Likely, he was once served as a choir boy in the Chapel Royale and then studied at Oxford as a King’s Scholar. He … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Chaucer, British history, drama, kings and queens, playwrights, poetry, political stance, theatre | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Oxfordshire St. George Play

Closely related to the Morris and Sword Dancers, the Oxfordshire St. George Play is considered a kind of Mummers Play. As well as possessing close elements of kinship, the characters in all these plays are largely interchangeable. That being said, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, drama, literature, medieval | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

The Second Shepherds’ Play, England’s “First Comedy”

  The Wakefield mystery play cycle included The Second Shepherd’s Play. The author is unknown, but the play is commonly attributed to the Wakefield Master. This play dates from the latter half of the 15th Century. It is written in Middle … Continue reading

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An English Mystery Play: Abraham and Isaac, the Brome Non-Cycle Play

The sacrifice of Isaac is the basis for six extant Miracle plays. There is also the Coventry cycle of plays, where Isaac submits to his fate. In the Towneley Plays, which are part of the York cycle, Isaac is made … Continue reading

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