Tag Archives: courtesy titles

Can Courtesy Titles Be Bestowed?

Since my last post on Courtesy Titles on February 15, I have received several inquires about how courtesy titles were bestowed upon others. First, permit me to clarify, once again, there is a difference between an actual title of the … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, history, Jane Austen, legacy, Living in the UK, Napoleonic Wars, real life tales, research, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

What is a “Dowager”? How is She Addressed?

 Likely, when someone uses the word “Dowager,” images of Dame Maggie Smith’s portrayal of Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham from “Downton Abbey” fame. But what does the word “dowager” mean? According to Wikipedia, a dowager is a widow who holds … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Regency era, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , ,

Courtesy Titles (or) Not, a Confusing Aspect of Reading and Writing Historical Novels

One of the most confusing aspects of writing Regency-based novels is the issue of courtesy titles. We authors are always going back and questioning what we think we know. I have heard readers say to me that this is one … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Inheritance, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

The Tale of Richard Bertie Continues, Part III

You may view the previous two posts on Richard Bertie at these links: Part I and Part II.  Briefly, Richard Bertie (ca. 1517 – 9 April 1582) was an English landowner and religious evangelical. He was the second husband of Catherine Willoughby, 12th … Continue reading

Posted in British history, England, estates, heraldry, Inheritance, marriage, marriage customs, peerage, primogenture, research, titles of aristocracy | Tagged , , , , , , ,

British Forms of Address

How does one address the members of the nobility or the aristocracy in England. That depends on whether a person is speaking directly to the person, writing to the person informally, and writing to the person in a formal situation. … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era, Scotland, Uncategorized, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments