Tag Archives: word play

From Where Does That Phrase Come?

Catch Word is a word under the right-hand side of the last line on a book page that repeats the first word on the following page – circa 1736. It was commonly used in printing. The phrase has come into … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Great Britain, real life tales, word play | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Euphemisms

Dictionary.com says a euphemism is “the substitution of a mild, indirect, or vague expression for one thought to be offensive, harsh, or blunt.”  Euphemisms are plentiful, some old and some of a more modern twists. Let us look at a … Continue reading

Posted in British history, euphemisms, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

I was reading a period piece recently and came across the words and phrases below. How many of these do you use? Verge – British: A grass edging such as that by the side of a road or path Embarazo – … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era, Victorian era, word play | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

Do You Know These Words and Phrases?

I have some words/phrases that are familiar and others perhaps not so. Enjoy the origins of these choice tidbits.  Butterfingers: (Phrases.org) A name playfully applied to someone who fails to catch a ball or lets something slip from their fingers. Several authorities Charles Dickens invented … Continue reading

Posted in American History, British history, Great Britain, Uncategorized, word play | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Are You Familiar with These Words and Phrases?

We have a variety of words that mean “stupid or foolish person” Ninnyhammer – First Known Use: 1592 Berk – The usage is dated to the 1930s. A shortened version of Berkeley Hunt, the hunt based at Berkeley Castle in … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Uncategorized, word play | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

Do You Know the Origins of These Words and Phrases?

Iron Curtain – This phrase was coined after World War II by Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Great Britain to describe the rise of Russian influence over Eastern Europe. Churchill found the rigid censorship of the citizenry and the closing … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, Uncategorized, word play | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Regency Era Lexicon – We Are Up to “H”

Regency Era Lexicon – Time for the Letter “H” Haberdasher – a man who dealt with small items for sewing, such as thread, needles, buttons, ribbons, etc. Hack – a general-purpose riding horse; not used for hunting or military purposes … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Regency Era Lexicon – “F” is for More Than “Failure”

Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Up to “F” fag – used in English public schools; denoted a younger boy who ran errands for an older student (to become “fatigued” by doing these errands) faggot – a grouping of sticks tied … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Regency Era Lexicon – “E” is Next on Our List

Regency Era Lexicon – The Fifth Letter is “E” Earnest Money – the first installment of a financial bargain; often the master of a household hiring a servant at a hiring fair offered earnest money to secure the person’s services … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

From Where Does That Phrase Come?

This first one is for Brian, who spoke of a preference for the word in one of my recent posts. Codswallop ~ Unknown, attested from 1959 episode of UK TV series Hancock’s Half Hour. The writers (Galton and Simpson) state that … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, legends and myths, Uncategorized, word play | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments