Tag Archives: poetry

A Closer Look at “Mr. Darcy’s Present: A Pride and Prejudice Holiday Vagary”

Mr. Darcy’s Present: A Pride and Prejudice Holiday Vagary from Regina Jeffers  is currently on sale until January 5, 2020. Enjoy the excerpt below.  Genre: Classics; Regency Romance; Austenesque; Christmas Romance Book Blurb: When we care more for another than … Continue reading

Posted in book excerpts, British history, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, historical fiction, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, marriage, poetry, Pride and Prejudice, Regency era, Regency romance, Vagary, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Robert Southwell, Jesuit Priest and Literary Contemporary of William Shakespeare

“Robert Southwell was born around 1561 at Horsham St. Faith, Norfolk, the youngest son and fifth child in a family of eight. The Southwells, a county family that had prospered from the dissolution of the monasteries, formed part of a … Continue reading

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Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey ~ Tudor Poet

Born in Hunsdon, Hertfordshire, in 1517, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, was the eldest of Thomas Howard and Lady Elizabeth Stafford’s children. Surrey was of royal descent on both the paternal and the maternal sides of his family. He received an … Continue reading

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Sir Thomas Wyatt (c. 1503 – 1542), 16th C English Ambassador and Lyrical Poet

Born to Henry and Anne Wyatt at Allington Castle, near Maidstone, Kent, in 1503, Thomas Wyatt made his first appearance at the royal court in 1516 as Sewer Extraordinary to Henry VIII.  In 1516 he also entered St. John’s College, … Continue reading

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Overview: Life and Literature in the Era of the Reformation

In Academics, the Reformation saw a revival of the study of Greek and Latin writings, as well as a love of beauty. “Humanism” became the newborn ideal, one that advocated individualism, an ideal which gave a tremendous impetus to literature … Continue reading

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14th Century Scottish Writers

Early Scottish literature includes works in English, Scottish Gaelic, Scots, Brythonic, French, Latin, and Norn. The earliest extant literature from what is now Scotland was a 6th Century Brythonic speech. Under the direction of the Catholic Church early literature was written … Continue reading

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John Gower, Medieval English Poet and Contemporary of William Langland and Geoffrey Chaucer

John Gower was a medieval English poet whose work spoke of moral allegory and courtly love. He was known to be a friend of Geoffrey Chaucer and their styles were compatible. Gower was said to influence many other poets of … Continue reading

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A Labor Day Break from Blogging…

LABOR DAY: WHAT IT MEANS According the U.S., Department of Labor, “Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a … Continue reading

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Anglo-Saxon Poetry

As poetry began as song and was easier to memorize because of the rhyme scheme and the rhythmic pattern, Anglo-Saxon poetry outstripped the period’s prose. The poems were passed from one generation to another by word of mouth.  Customarily, Anglo-Saxon poetry … Continue reading

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Anglo-Saxon Literature – Part II: Charms and Riddles

The transition from pagan thoughts to the dogma of Christianity was slow to go. Appeasing the populace to look upon a Christian society with acceptance was a difficult task. Charms reflect pagan superstition and folklore. Even so, it was not … Continue reading

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