Regency Lexicon – The Letters “X,” “Y,” and “Z”

Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Coming to the End – X, Y, and Z

xebec – a small three-masted Mediterranean vessel with both square and lateen sails, originally used by Algerian pirates and later used for commerce

yager – a 19th Century rifle; a muzzle-loading hunting rifle

yam – a posting house along a road

Gallery - Bookbinding, Leather Book Binder, Cloth Book Binding ... www.bookrestorations.com.au

Gallery – Bookbinding, Leather Book Binder, Cloth Book Binding …
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yapp – a type of bookbinding in which the leather edges overlap the pages

yarborough – a hand of 13 cards in which no card is higher than a nine; supposed to be named after the second Earl of Yarborough (1809–62), who is said to have bet a thousand to one against the occurrence of such a hand

yardland – an archaic medieval unit of land, between 15 and 40 acres, depending upon the locality; a virgate; a peasant who holds the land

yawl – a two-masted sailing vessel, rigged fore-and-aft, with a large mainmast and a small mizzenmast stepped aft of the rudder post; a ship’s small boat, usually rowed by four or six oars

yellow – the color of the Whigs during elections; the Tories used blue

yellow fever – a tropical disease spread by mosquitoes; those who traveled to the West Indies were exposed to the disease

yeoman – an independent farmer with land of his own, usually 300-1000 acres

yeomanry – the mounted, wealthier faction of the militia

The Archbishop of York – is a high-ranking cleric in the Church of England, second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury. He is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of York and the metropolitan of the Province of York, which covers the northern portion of England (north of the Trent) as well as the Isle of Man. The archbishop is a member ex officio of the House of Lords, and is styled Primate of England. (The Archbishop of Canterbury is “Primate of All England.”)

Yorkshire Pudding Day | School of Artisan Food – Blog blog.schoolofartisanfood.org

Yorkshire Pudding Day | School of Artisan Food – Blog
blog.schoolofartisanfood.org

Yorkshire Pudding – Yorkshire Pudding, also known as batter pudding, is a dish named after Yorkshire, England, though there is no evidence it originated from there. It is made from batter and usually served with roast meat and gravy.

Your Grace – the form of address for a duke or duchess when addressed by the nobility or the gentry; also the form of address for an archbishop by everyone

Your Highness – used in direct conversation with the nephews, nieces, and cousins of the sovereign

Your Majesty – used in direct conversation with the king or queen

Your Royal Highness – used in direct conversation with the monarch’s spouse, children, and siblings

Your Worship – the form of address for a magistrate

zemindar – in colonial India, an indigenous revenue collector or landholder

zibeline – a sable; a thick cloth made of wool or other animal hair, having a long nap and a dull sheen

zounds—An oath or swear-word, contracted from God’s wounds. It had about the same degree of offensiveness as the modern “damn.”

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About reginajeffers

Regina Jeffers is the award-winning author of Austenesque, Regency and contemporary novels.
This entry was posted in British history, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, real life tales, Regency era and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Regency Lexicon – The Letters “X,” “Y,” and “Z”

  1. carolcork says:

    Roast beef and Yorkshire Pudding is still a favourite for Sunday lunch.

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