Monthly Archives: March 2015

Have You Heard of the Oxford Electric Bell?

The Oxford Electric Bell or Clarendon Dry Pile is an experimental electric bell that was set up in 1840 and which has run almost continuously ever since, apart from occasional short interruptions caused by high humidity. It was “one of … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, Bells, British history, Great Britain, real life tales, Uncategorized, Victorian era | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Are You Familiar with “Franklin Bells”?

Franklin bells (also known as Gordon’s Bells or Lightning bells) are an early demonstration of electric charge designed to work with a Leyden jar. Franklin bells are only a qualitative indicator of electric charge and were used for simple demonstrations … Continue reading

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Win a Manuscript Evaluation from Barbara Kyle – No Entry Fee!!!

Barbara Kyle is a master writer who teaches classes on writing, as well as being an accomplished author. More important for those working on their own manuscripts, Barbara is offering a contest to win a manuscript evaluation from her.  What … Continue reading

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Lozenge, Heraldry for Women

One of yesterday’s words was “lozenge.” It brought my interest and sent me looking for a tidbit or two on the topic.The lozenge in heraldry is a diamond-shaped charge (an object that can be placed on the field of the … Continue reading

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Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Up to the Letter “L”

Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Up to the Letter “L” £ – symbol for the pound, a monetary unit Ladies’ Mile – a road in Hyde Park set aside for women Lady – used in the following manner: colloquially used … Continue reading

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Rame Head

Rame Head is a coastal headland, southwest of the village of Rame in southeast Cornwall, United Kingdom. The area plays a prominent role in the climax of my Regency romance, The First Wives’ Club, which earned an honorable mention in historical … Continue reading

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Have You Heard of “Forlorn Hope”?

From 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, we find “forlorn hope” as defined as, “FORLORN HOPE (through Dutch verloren hoop, from Ger. verlorene Haufe=”lost troop”; Haufe, “heap,” being equivalent in the 17th century to “body of troops”; the French equivalent is enfants perdu), … Continue reading

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