Monthly Archives: January 2013

Regency Era Lexicon – We’re Coming to the End – X, Y, and Z

xebec – a small three-masted Mediterranean vessel with both square and lateen sails, originally used by Algerian pirates and later used for commerce yager – a 19th Century rifle; a muzzle-loading hunting rifle yam – a posting house along a road yapp – a … Continue reading

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“Going Courtin'” in the Regency Era

Society during the Regency era expected strict propriety from its young people. Sometimes the rules were strict and unreasonable, but somehow the youth of Jane Austen’s time managed to come together. Young men of the time were often older than … Continue reading

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The Governess: Qualified to Teach the Usual Branches of a Good English Education

A governess’s job was to teach the children of middle and upper class households in 19th Century England. By 1850, there were 21,000 governesses registered in England. In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, our heroine places the following advertisement, which eventually lands … Continue reading

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Oh, the Places You Will Go (Part 2)…the Settings for Jane Austen’s Novel

Sense and Sensibility Norland Park in Sussex – the Dashwood’s family estate Barton Park in Devonshire – home of Sir John Middleton Barton Cottage in Devonshire – home of the Dashwood women Delaford in Devonshire – home of Colonel Brandon … Continue reading

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Courtship During the Regency Period

Expectations placed on young people of the aristocracy and the gentry were quite high. A young man was “expected” to make a match that would bring wealth or position to his family name. First, a gentleman was often several years … Continue reading

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Regency Era Lexicon – Nearing the End: We’re at “W”

wafer – made of flour and gum; one dampened the wafer and then placed it on a letter to seal it waggonette – a four-wheel lightweight carriage; used for pleasure trips such as picnics, etc.; common mode of transportation for … Continue reading

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The Massacre at St. Peter’s Field

The events at Peterloo play a pivotal point in my February release of His. Peterloo brings my heroine and hero together in the second of the two novellas, “His Irish Eve,” which make up this new anthology. On August 16, … Continue reading

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Poison, Passion, and Politics

The German scholar, Albertus Magnus, is generally credited with the discovery of arsenic in or about 1250. All sorts of poisons have been used since the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Greeks had a fondness for water … Continue reading

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Celebrating the Epiphany

Epiphany (Koine Greek: ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, “manifestation”, “striking appearance”) or Theophany (Ancient Greek (ἡ) Θεοφάνεια, Theophaneai meaning “vision of God”), which traditionally falls on January 6, is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God the Son as a human in the form of Jesus Christ. Western Christians commemorate … Continue reading

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The Twelve Days of Jane Austen – Day 12

On the twelfth day of Christmas, Jane Austen gave to me Twelve Months of Reading Eleven Woodhouse/Knightleys Ten in Fanny’s Family Nine Named Musgrove Eight Minor Pieces Seven Austen Siblings Six Classic Novels F-i-v-e Bennet Sisters Four Abbey Tilneys Three … Continue reading

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