Monthly Archives: April 2017

Georgian Era Commerce, Part III: The Surrey Docks and the East India Docks

The cargo handling docks of the early nineteenth century were the West India Docks, the London Docks, the Greenland Docks, the East India Docks, and the St. Katherine’s Docks. Previously, we explored an overview of the time period and a … Continue reading

Posted in British history, commerce, Great Britain, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Significance of Books and of Reading in Jane Austen’s Novels, Guest Post from Lauren Gilbert

  The Significance of Books and Reading in Jane Austen’s Novels By Lauren Gilbert  Jane Austen was a reader.  She read widely.  We know she enjoyed novels; she was a subscriber to Fanny Burney’s third novel, Cecilia or Memoirs of … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, books, British history, family, George Wickham, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Guest Blog, Guest Post, Jane Austen, literature, Living in the Regency, Pride and Prejudice, reading | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Black Monday Tragedy

 Black Monday was the Monday after Easter on 13 April 1360, during the Hundred Years’ War (1337 – 1360). The Hundred Years’ War began in 1337; by 1359, King Edward III of England was actively attempting to conquer France. In October, … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Edward III, kings and queens, military | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

The Quem Quaeritis Trope, the Roots of Liturgical Drama

 The first Easter or Quem Quaeritis trope had its beginnings in the Benedictine Abbey of St. Gall, Switzerland. (The script of this first trope and an accompanying translation can be found below.) The Easter trope became the model for similar … Continue reading

Posted in acting, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, drama, medieval | Tagged , , , ,

Courts of Chancery, Barristers, and Solicitors

In the 15th Century, the Court of Chancery or of “equity” developed. It was under the lord high chancellor and provided an outlet for cases where results were not obtainable in the courts of common law. The courts of common … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, British history, buildings and structures, Georgian England, history | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Princess Helena’s Marriage Splits Queen Victoria’s Family

Princess Helena chose to marry Prince Christian, one of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburgs. On the maternal side, Prince Christian held ties to a Danish noble family, as well as to the British royal family. His grandmother was the granddaughter of Frederick, King George II’s … Continue reading

Posted in British history, family, history, kings and queens, marriage, political stance, Victorian era | Tagged , , , , , ,

The Trauma of PTSD and How It Plays Out in The Prosecution of Mr. Darcy’s Cousin, a 2016 Finalist for the Chanticleer International Book Awards

In my The Prosecution of Mr. Darcy’s Cousin: A Pride and Prejudice Mystery, Darcy’s cousin Major General Fitzwilliam (the former Colonel Fitzwilliam from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice) suffers from what we would now call “PTSD.” During the Regency there … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, Great Britain, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , , | 14 Comments