Monthly Archives: January 2018

In Quest of the Officers, a Guest Post from Diana J. Oaks

Below you will find another of the fabulous posts one might find on any given day on Austen Authors. Diana J. Oaks explores the “appeal” of a man (or woman) in uniform.  Lydia Bennet. She’s naughty, she’s loud, she’s determined … Continue reading

Posted in Austen Authors, British history, British Navy, George Wickham, Guest Post, historical fiction, history, Living in the Regency, manuscript evaluation, military, Pride and Prejudice | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on In Quest of the Officers, a Guest Post from Diana J. Oaks

Moral Ramifications of Wife Sales

  Last week, I looked at Wife Selling as a Means to a Moral Divorce, but Not Necessarily a Legal One. Today, I will stay with the moral aspects of this practice of the late 1700s and the first half of … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Church of England, customs and tradiitons, Georgian England, history, Living in the UK, marriage, marriage customs, marriage licenses, real life tales, research | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Moral Ramifications of Wife Sales

Jane Austen’s Health Problems, a Guest Post by Kyra Kramer

Jane Austen’s Problematic Health Predicting the due date of a pregnancy is a matter of guesswork, even in these modern times. Babies are notorious for following their own schedule rather than the convenience of their mother, midwife, or obstetrician. Nevertheless, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 9 Comments

Austen Fandom vs. Austen Academics, a Guest Post from Melanie Rachel

This post appeared on Austen Authors in November 2016. As I am often asked why I choose to spend part of my writing career authoring JAFF (Jane Austen Fan Fiction), perhaps Melanie Rachel’s explanation of what she experienced at the … Continue reading

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Wife Selling as a Means to a Moral Divorce, but Not Necessarily a Legal One

From the late 18th to the mid 19th centuries in England, divorce was expense—too expense for many of the populace. Divorce required a private Act of Parliament that could cost the petitioner somewhere around £3000. It also required the blessing … Continue reading

Posted in Act of Parliament, book excerpts, England, Georgian England, Georgian Era, Great Britain, history, Living in the Regency, marriage, marriage customs, real life tales, Regency era | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

Ben Jonson’s “Song to Celia” ~ The Poem You Did Not Know Was a Song

 One of my favorite love songs comes to us from the poet Ben Jonson. According to Poets.org, “The poet, essayist, and playwright Ben Jonson was born on June 11, 1572 in London, England. In 1598, Jonson wrote what is considered his … Continue reading

Posted in British history, literature, love quotes, music, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Author’s “Voice” ~ What is It?

Writers often hear another author warn them about losing their “voice.” But what exactly is “voice”? In reality, there are so many theories on this question that I could be here for years debating them all. I am of the … Continue reading

Posted in editing, literature, publishing, reading, word choices, word origins, word play, writing | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments