Monthly Archives: March 2015

Do You Know the Origins of These Words and Phrases?

Iron Curtain – This phrase was coined after World War II by Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Great Britain to describe the rise of Russian influence over Eastern Europe. Churchill found the rigid censorship of the citizenry and the closing … Continue reading

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Why Do We Not Know Whether Elizabeth Bennet Learns to Despise Mr. Wickham?

By Regina Jeffers Recently, I was writing a scene for an upcoming Austen release, and in it, I attempted to explain Elizabeth Bennet’s lack of “hatred” for George Wickham. Even after having read “Pride and Prejudice” well over 50 times … Continue reading

Posted in George Wickham, Jane Austen, Living in the Regency, Regency era | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Regency Era Lexicon – Letters “I,” “J,” and “K”

Regency Era Lexicon – the Letters “I” and “J” and “K” Imperial – the term “imperial” designated the officially adopted uniform system of weights and measures that replaced the MANY different standards that the English had used prior to 1820 … Continue reading

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King George III’s Children – Part 2

King George III’s Children – Part 2 Before succumbing to his illness, George III had a sometime tempestuous relationship with members of his family. The king’s second son, Prince Frederick, Duke of York, found himself in a scandal, along with … Continue reading

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The Children of King George III

The Children of King George  George III’s and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz’s many children and grandchildren included: (1) George Augustus Frederick, Prince of Wales (and later King George IV) was the heir apparent (1762-1830). George IV married Caroline of Brunswick. Princess … Continue reading

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