Regency Era Lexicon – Letters “I,” “J,” and “K”

Regency Era Lexicon – the Letters “I” and “J” and “K”

Imperial – the term “imperial” designated the officially adopted uniform system of weights and measures that replaced the MANY different standards that the English had used prior to 1820

Impropriate – tithes made to a layman rather than to a member of the clergy

Indenture – the agreement between an apprentice and the master craftsman

India Office – the governmental office that oversaw “issues” in India

india rubber – used to make erasers

inform – to bring formal criminal charges against a person

in-law – used to both designate a relationship achieved through marriage (mother-in-law, brother-in-law, etc.), as well as a step relationship [also “brother” and “sister” was often used to designate an “in-law” relationship]

Inns of Court – four institutions [the Inner Temple, the Middle Temple, Lincoln’s Inn, and Gray’s Inn] which housed barristers and their law offices, as well as dining facilities for the barristers and law students

Irish Union Act – actually two complementary acts [The Union with Ireland Act 1800 and The Act of Union 1800]; passed on 2 July 1800 and 1 August 1800 respectively, the twin Acts united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland; the union came into effect on 1 January 1801

ironmongers – a seller of hardware

irregulars – part-time volunteers or militia

Jackboots 18th Century

Jackboots 18th Century

jackboots – above the knee boots, often worn by the military to protect the knee/leg from leg injuries and sword attacks

Jack Ketch – an infamous hangman from the 1600s; his name became synonymous with the hangman

Janeites – a term used for devoted fans of Jane Austen; was popularized by Rudyard Kipling in a short story called “The Janeites,” first published in 1924

jet – coal that is highly polished and made into beads, etc.; one of the few jewels that were considered acceptable to wear during mourning

jig – a lively one-person dance

jobber – one who rented horses

The Jockey Club and later The Female Jockey Club (a supposedly anonymous pamphlet, also known as Sketch of the Manners of the Age) – written in 1792 and 1794 (respectively) by the Radical journalist Charles Pigott; to answer the questions of the Prince Regent “unsuitable friends,” his mistress Mrs Fitzherbert, and his debts. “This anonymous book is the work of Charles Pigott, a radical satirist who ran the gauntlet of persecution for his political views. Piggot wrote the Jockey Club in 1792 followed by The Female Jockey Club some two years later. Both mix character assassination with radical politics, denouncing the opulence of the aristocracy amidst ‘deplorable wretchedness’. Although the full names of the ladies here scrutinized are suppressed, there is little doubt of their true identity. Not all are uniformly denounced, and several are praised for their charity and kindness.” Hordern Books

The Female Jockey Club, or a Sketch of Manners of the Age. London: D.I. Eaton, [1792-] 1794. 4 parts in 2 volumes, stated fifth, second and third editions. Early marbled boards rebacked to style. ©William Doyle Galleries NY http://www.doylenewyork. com/asp/fullcatalogue. aspsalelot=11FA01++++73+&refno=++837041&image=3

The Female Jockey Club, or a Sketch of Manners of the Age. London: D.I. Eaton, [1792-] 1794. 4 parts in 2 volumes, stated fifth, second and third editions. Early marbled boards rebacked to style. ©William Doyle Galleries NY http://www.doylenewyork.
com/asp/fullcatalogue.
aspsalelot=11FA01++++73+&refno=++837041&image=3

jointure – the portion of the husband’s estate which he would leave to his widow upon his death; part of the “marriage settlements” which preceded marriages

joseph – an old-fashioned long coat, which was worn by a woman when riding; was buttoned down the front

junior lordship – subordinate positons in governmental departments

justice of the peace – position to regulate peaceful/law affairs in a county; commissioned from the lord lieutenant

Juvenilia – the early works of Jane Austen

Kensington – an area just beyond Hyde Park in the western section of London

King’s Bench – one of the three superior courts of common law that sat in Westminster Hall in London; heard criminal cause

K. C. – an abbreviation following the name of barristers who were actually supposed to be counselors to the king; the initials represent “King’s Counsel”

knife – long favored as the instrument with which one ate; forks were late comers to the English table.

knight – the lowest of the titled ranks; used “Sir” before his given name (Sir William in Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”); his wife was “Lady” + surname (Lady Lucas); a knight’s property was not automatically entailed

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About reginajeffers

Regina Jeffers is the award-winning author of Austenesque, Regency and contemporary novels.
This entry was posted in British history, Great Britain, Jane Austen, lexicon, Living in the Regency, Regency era, vocabulary and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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